Legacy.com Honors Country's Service Members On Day of Remembrance - Legacies of Military Personnel Live on Through Online Memorialization

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Upon the inception of Memorial Day in 1868, the loved ones of those who died in the Civil War visited cemeteries to adorn gravestones with flowers and attended memorials to speak about the deceased. The tradition is still alive 142 years later. However, in a sign of the times, the once in-person traditions have expanded to include electronic acts of remembrance.

Online Memorialization

Legacy.com, the leader in online memorialization, has added an "In Remembrance" page to its site to honor men and women who died in Iraq and Afghanistan.

Upon the inception of Memorial Day in 1868, the loved ones of those who died in the Civil War visited cemeteries to adorn gravestones with flowers and attended memorials to speak about the deceased. The tradition is still alive 142 years later. However, in a sign of the times, the once in-person traditions have expanded to include electronic acts of remembrance.

Online memorialization has become an increasingly popular way for mourners to express condolences to loved ones. Indeed, one of the 100 most-visited websites on the Internet, Legacy.com, is devoted to memorializing the deceased.

This Memorial Day, Legacy.com, which partners with thousands of newspapers and funeral homes to publish obituaries and offer tools for paying tribute, will enhance its special section honoring service members killed in Iraq or Afghanistan with a collection of notes submitted to the site by living service members for their fallen comrades. Previously, Legacy.com has featured similar homage to women serving in Iraq and Afghanistan, Medal of Honor recipients and D-Day veterans.

“In Remembrance,” which is accessible via Legacy.com and more than 900 newspaper websites, is regularly visited by the service members’ survivors, including Carly Sizer, whose son, Spc. Dane Balcon, was featured in a USA Today story about online memorialization. “Your legacy will live on forever…I promise…,” Sizer wrote in her son’s Legacy Guest Book the day before Memorial Day 2008. Also posted on his “In Remembrance” profile was an essay the young soldier had written for an ROTC class: “When I go, I hope that they remember me and what I did.”

“We are proud to provide a place online where Americans around the world can gather, remember and honor those who have served our country – a long-standing tradition, now updated to fit our digital age,” says Stopher Bartol, president and CEO of Legacy.com. “We’re also happy to be able to highlight some of the many touching remarks left by surviving service members.”

In addition to the special site, which was a finalist for the prestigious Webby Award, Legacy.com publishes obituaries for seven of 10 Americans, through its newspaper and funeral home partnerships. Credited for popularizing the online Guest Book as a widely accepted way to remember loved ones and offer condolences, Legacy.com fields nearly 800,000 new Guest Book entries each month for people who have died.

For more information, visit http://www.legacy.com/soldier/home.aspx.

ABOUT LEGACY.COM
Founded in 1998, Legacy.com (http://www.Legacy.com) is the world's most timely and comprehensive resource for online obituaries and the undisputed leader in Web-based memorialization. The Legacy.com domain is among the 100 most-visited on the Internet, according to comScore, and includes a network of more than 900 newspapers in the United States, Canada, the United Kingdom, Ireland and Australia. By making interactive memorial content accessible directly via the websites of newspapers and funeral homes, Legacy.com helps a fast-growing number of people expand the ways in which they can express condolences and share remembrances of loved ones. A privately held company, Legacy.com is headquartered in Evanston, Ill.

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Alison Hamer
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