Klinge Refrigeration Systems Offer Safe, Reliable Container Solution for Dangerous Goods

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• International shipping code – new rules on hazardous goods • Shipping companies refusing loads unless transported in recognizably suitable containers • Klinge refrigerated containers are a name trusted by shipping companies around the world – explosion-proof and/or suitable for hazardous locations

Companies using intermodal containers to ship hazardous goods around the world are now facing tougher safety standards for their shipments.

In particular, shipping companies have been tightening up procedures this year for temperature-sensitive hazardous and/or self-reactive cargo.

Many are requiring the use of recognized transport refrigeration equipment such as that produced by US firm Klinge Corporation.

Regulations:
Amendments to the International Maritime Dangerous Goods Code came into force at the beginning of 2010 that have meant more materials being classified as “hazardous”.

Under the new rules, any substances that could potentially cause danger to the vessels or pollute the marine environment are re-classified as “environmentally hazardous substances”. There are stricter requirements for labelling and transporting these hazardous shipments.

The amended rules also include a number of new entries in the international Dangerous Goods List.
Shipping companies require hazardous substances from class 4.1 up to class 5.2 of the International Maritime Dangerous Goods code be transported in specialized temperature-controlled container systems, such as those manufactured by Klinge Corporation.

Checks:
Hazardous loads are facing more and more checks from shipping companies and port authorities – including the use of sophisticated x-ray technology – to ensure safety for staff, the public and the environment.

Insurance providers may also now refuse to cover hazardous shipments that are not transported in recognized container solutions.

Companies shipping hazardous or explosive materials are increasingly turning to Klinge Corporation to provide container systems that guard against hazards and explosion risks.

Henrik Klinge, President and CEO of Klinge Corporation, said: “In today’s increasingly safety and security conscious world, fewer shipping companies will take hazardous cargo unless it is within a recognized container system.

“The Klinge name is very much respected by shipping captains because they know they can rely on our rugged containers to provide the required cooling whatever the conditions outside.”
Explosion-proof

Klinge Corporation, which is based in York, Pennsylvania, offers a range of container refrigeration and heating systems for transport of hazardous materials.

Klinge containers feature microprocessor-based temperature controls, satellite tracking and alarm monitoring systems.

  • The Picture Frame Refrigeration Unit (PFR) Model 571 ZII-II offers explosion-proof motors and components designed to maintain space temperatures in Zone 2 hazardous locations.
  • The Nose Mount Refrigeration Unit (NMR) dual refrigeration system Model 262 is designed for dangerous and temperature sensitive cargo, offering primary and back-up temperature control systems to ensure complete and independent protection for shipments.
  • Klinge’s Tank Container Refrigeration Unit (TCR) Model 104 is profiled to fit the shape of tank containers to maintain temperatures in liquid cargo.

Klinge Corporation is the leading provider of specialized transport refrigeration in the world and is ISO 9001 certified.

The company has 30 years of experience in specialized container systems, with offices in Egypt and Denmark as well as in York, Pennsylvania. The company also provides a worldwide network of trusted support facilities.

For more information or images, please call Jason Flynn at the Klinge Corporation Sales Department at 717-840-4500.

Notes for Editors

  • More than 4 million intermodal containers are used to ship hazardous and non-hazardous goods around the world each year.
  • The International Maritime Dangerous Goods Code is governed by the International Maritime Organization, and was adopted back in 1965.
  • The Code governs issues including packing, container traffic and stowage, with a particular focus on the need to segregate incompatible substances.
  • Amendment 34-08 came into force on January1, 2010, including extra controls on marine pollutants.

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Jason Flynn
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