75% of Businesses Putting Their "Business Reputation At Risk"

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A survey carried out this month on 500 UK businesses has revealed some staggering findings on how little attention is often paid to their own online reputation. 80% of those taking part revealed that they regularly conduct online searches on suppliers or prospective clients. However 75%, almost as many, admitted that they had not conducted any kind of online search whatsoever regarding their own brand, business names, product names, or the names of their key individuals within the previous 4 weeks.

Reputation 24/7

Reputation can cripple a business of both fresh talent and revenue

A survey carried out this month on 500 UK businesses has revealed some staggering findings on how little attention is often paid to their own online reputation.

The survey was carried out by Liverpool based Reputation 24/7 (http://www.reputation247.com)], one of the UK’s leading specialist’s in Online Reputation Management. It’s findings showed that whilst business owners were fully aware of how business has changed and the crucial importance of online, it is believed that only 1% of UK businesses monitor their own reputation. With over six billion people using the internet such negligence could prove a costly mistake.

80% of those taking part revealed that they regularly conduct online searches on suppliers or prospective clients. However 75%, almost as many, admitted that they had not conducted any kind of online search whatsoever regarding their own brand, business names, product names, or the names of their key individuals within the previous 4 weeks.

Negative reputation can accumulate very quickly and over a third of UK businesses have been affected by some form of negative perception. It can be genuine negative sentiment from customer review sites, news and media sites or the site of a competitor, or it may be malicious references left by competitors or disgruntled employees. Indiscreet revelations by employees using social media platforms such as Blogs and Twitter is also becoming a growing problem.

Nathan Barker, Founder of Reputation 24/7 says “75% of businesses putting their business reputation at risk. The myth that ‘we are a reputable company, so we don’t need this’ should end. We are talking here about six billion opinions. One disgruntled customer or ex-employee can reach the world. In several instances we have come across staff whom clients considered good employees and yet were going straight home and criticising the business on their blog or twitter pages."

" In one instance an indiscreet employee was innocently discussing how busy the office was preparing for ‘important visitors’ these visitors – were a delegation of potential buyers and this had been broadcast by mobile phone to the world.”

“Businesses feel that if they don’t actually sell a product online, that this doesn’t affect them. Imagine if you were applying for a role in a company, or considering using a business to be your sole supplier. The very first thing you would do is Google them. In this instance your online reputation will affect not only your ability to generate sales but also to recruit for the business. Reputation can cripple a business of both fresh talent and revenue.”

Reputation 24/7 uses sophisticated internet monitoring technology which identifies mentions of keywords across 1,000,000,000,000 web pages.

These are commonly business names, brand and product names, trademarks and copyright material or names of employees. The company also scans News sites, image and video sites, standard website pages and blogs and social media sites such as Twitter.

At a cost of just £199 per year Reputation 24/7 offers clients a fully managed service with email, telephone and RSS alerts and full web interface tracking and interaction. The company will also offer assistance in handling online reputation crisis.

To find out more about Online Reputation Management visit the company’s website at http://www.reputation247.com or call 0151 244 5419.

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