Paul Davis Restoration Offers Tips To Consumers During Hurricane Season

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June is National Hurricane Preparedness Month. As a public service, Paul Davis Restoration, Inc. a national franchise company and leading provider of fire and water damage clean up and restoration services for residential and commercial properties, provides consumers with the following hurricane preparedness information.

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You do not have to wait for an insurance claims representative to arrive on the scene to evaluate the loss. Waiting increases the likelihood of secondary damage that might not be covered by insurance

June is National Hurricane Preparedness Month. As a public service, Paul Davis Restoration, Inc. a national franchise company and leading provider of fire and water damage clean up and restoration services for residential and commercial properties, provides consumers with the following hurricane preparedness information. This information is to remind property owners of the importance of preparing for the potential damage from the high winds, heavy rains, storm surge and tornados that accompany hurricanes.

The Atlantic hurricane season runs from June 1 until November 30 and according to the National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration (NOAA), damage from hurricanes average more than $5 billion annually.

According to J. "Sonny" Bass, Paul Davis' Technical Director of Emergency Services, there are many useful steps to follow which can promote personal and household safety during hurricane season.

Bass recommends the following tips for hurricane preparedness:

Pre-hurricane season preparation:

  • Enter the season prepared; put together a plan for your family and go over it with them.
  • Know your evacuation routes.
  • Make sure your home meets building codes for withstanding hurricanes.
  • Put together a Basic Emergency Kit to include proper tools, supplies and a first aid kit.
  • Have plenty of batteries and flashlights and at least a 3-day supply of water and non-perishable foods on hand.

When a hurricane watch or warning is issued:

  • Leave low lying areas.
  • Protect windows with plywood boards or storm shutters.
  • Secure outside objects.
  • Make sure you have plenty of food and water for several days and for each family member.
  • Evacuate if instructed to leave the area.

What to do before the storm:

  • Be ready to put your plan and preparation to action.
  • Pay attention to local weather reports on radio, TV or the Internet.
  • Have the house boarded up or have storm shutters in place.
  • Make sure all your tools, supplies, first aid, food, fuel and personal items are ready for use.
  • Have a secure room available.

What to do during the storm:

  • Stay in a secure room and away from windows.
  • Don't use the telephone or candles.
  • Monitor weather and civic service bulletins on either regular or NOAA weather radio.
  • Have supplies on hand.
  • Remain indoors when the eye of the hurricane moves over your area, the storm will resume shortly.

Safety tips after the storm:

  • Make sure everyone is safe and accounted for.
  • Monitor the radio for information from emergency management officials in your area.
  • Before venturing outside, ensure the storm has completely passed.
  • Report downed power lines and stay away from them.
  • Use stored water and food.
  • Be patient until your environment is safe and back to normal.

After the hurricane, Bass suggests that if storm-related damage occurs to the home, there are many variables to consider about cleanup and repairs.

Bass suggests that property owners consult with professionals who have specific training and experience in this area.

"It is important for property owners to begin the process of cleaning up and repairing any damage immediately," said Bass. "You do not have to wait for an insurance claims representative to arrive on the scene to evaluate the loss. Waiting increases the likelihood of secondary damage that might not be covered by insurance," he said.

Before taking any action, Bass recommends that personal safety should be the first and foremost consideration. "As a result of hurricanes and other storms, electrical shock is always a danger. Turning off the electricity to damaged areas is advisable if this can be done safely. Also, turn off the water supply if leaking or broken pipes are discovered," said Bass.

Bass along with the Institute of Inspection, Cleaning and Restoration Certification (IICRC) recommends contacting a professional water restoration or general contractor who has specialized water-detection and structural clean-up equipment to assist in the highly specialized work. The contractor can help to identify the source of water and extent of wetting along with specific structural damage and act accordingly. A certified professional can be located by calling the non-profit IICRC toll free at 1.800.835.4624 or by contacting Paul Davis Restoration which employs only certified technicians with IICRC at 1.888.473.7669.

For more information contact NOAA at noaa.gov or The American Red Cross at redcross.org.

Paul Davis Restoration, Inc. is a leading provider of fire, water and mold damage restoration and reconstruction services for residential and commercial properties. They also provide remodeling services for kitchen and bath remodeling and room additions. Paul Davis Restoration office owners nationwide are properly licensed individuals with certifications from leading industry organizations like The Institute of Inspection, Cleaning and Restoration Certification (IICRC). Founded in 1966, Paul Davis Restoration has franchise office locations throughout North America. Visit the website at http://www.pdrestoration.com.

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Malcolm Stone

Bonnie Hayflick
Bonnie Hayflick PR Counsel
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