George Mason University’s Volgenau School of Information Technology and Engineering Offers New Leading Edge Bioengineering Undergraduate Degree Program

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Volgenau School of Information Technology receives approval for new BS in Bioengineering degree for fall 2010.

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This is an exciting step for the Volgenau School and a tremendous resource to businesses in the metro region and the country

George Mason University, the largest public university in Virginia, is once again on the forefront of science and commerce just having obtained approval from the State Council of Higher Education for Virginia to offer a Bachelor of Science degree in Bioengineering for the fall 2010 semester.

With the growing cost of healthcare and the effect of novel technology on the fundamental understanding of bioscience, the demand for bioengineers is growing. The Bachelor of Science Bioengineering degree will provide students a strong background in the biological and engineering fundamentals, focusing on biomedical measurements and instrumentation, biomedical signal processing, computational analysis, and modeling of biological systems.

The new academic program is being led by the Volgenau School of Information Technology and Engineering and leverages established bioscience programs at George Mason University.

“This is an exciting step for the Volgenau School and a tremendous resource to businesses in the metro region and the country,” says Volgenau School Dean, Lloyd Griffiths. “Our Bioengineering program was launched in 2005 with the mission to conduct research at the interface of biomedicine and engineering and to produce highly skilled graduates with multidisciplinary training. This new degree offering furthers that important goal.”

Joseph J. Pancrazio, PhD, the program’s director adds, “Establishing and maintaining high caliber research activities that will come from this new degree is essential to the growth of Bioengineering at the Volgenau School. We are now also better able to implement the highest quality educational experience for our students.”

Bioengineering, is the application of engineering techniques to solve problems in biology and medicine, and has been responsible for numerous biomedical innovations including medical ultrasound, renal dialysis, magnetic resonance imaging, the cardiac pacemaker, cochlear implant, and the heart-lung machine.

The Volgenau School curriculum will prepare students for employment in industry or government where career opportunities include biomedical product design, evaluation, bioinformatics, project management, or technical sales. It is expected that many Bioengineering students will also pursue advanced studies in graduate or medical school.

Bioengineering at George Mason University is supported by federal agencies including the National Science Foundation and the National Institutes of Health and Bioengineering. Additionally, faculty collaborates with nearby federal laboratories and clinical centers in the Washington, D.C. metropolitan area. Current research interests and expertise of the Bioengineering faculty include: computational biology, bioinformatics, medical imaging, and neural engineering.

For more information about Bioengineering at George Mason University visit the program online at to http://bioengineering.gmu.edu/ or call 703.993.4190.

George Mason University’s Volgenau School of Information Technology and Engineering is one of the fastest growing academic centers for IT in the greater Washington, D.C. area. The school provides students with leading technology resources, renowned faculty, and a progressive program of studies and opportunities to prepare them for business and beyond. For more information on the Volgenau School visit them at http://volgenau.gmu.edu/.

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