Economic Recovery; Are You Getting Your Share? Jeffrey Koser Presents at the 2010 Wisconsin Entrepreneurs' Conference

The award winning author explains "Why Sales Has Yet To Benefit from the Economic Recovery." It has been duly noted that complex sales has yet to catch up with the economic recovery. But Jeffrey A. Koser, at this year's Wisconsin Entrepreneurs' Conference, actually took it upon himself to explain why: “Sales seems condemned to go on wishing for a past that it can never bring back. Meanwhile, business is out there to be had and no one knows how to go after it. This is because the new economy demands a new brand of seller, one who understands and can address the needs of decision makers, not just operations staff.”

  • Share on TwitterShare on FacebookShare on Google+Share on LinkedInEmail a friend

Hartland, WI (PRWEB) June 12, 2010

The award winning author explains "Why Sales Has Yet To Benefit from the Economic Recovery." It has been duly noted that complex sales has yet to catch up with the economic recovery. But Jeffrey A. Koser, at this year's Wisconsin Entrepreneurs' Conference, actually took it upon himself to explain why: “Sales seems condemned to go on wishing for a past that it can never bring back. Meanwhile, business is out there to be had and no one knows how to go after it. This is because the new economy demands a new brand of seller, one who understands and can address the needs of decision makers, not just operations staff.”

Koser went on to argue that while in the past sales organizations have been able to make money by selling their solutions to operations staff or low level executives, these days are now gone. While the economy is certainly improving (and there are statistics to show this), discretionary spending is tighter than it has been in years. The natural result is that spending can now only be authorized by high level officials such as the CFO, the CEO, or even the board of a given company. Hence, sellers must address the concerns of these officials in order to succeed in the new economy; selling based on operational value simply just won't work any more for the simple reason that operations staff no longer have the power to sign off on even mid-sized projects.

“The first thing that sales organizations need to do in order to get their share of the economic recovery,” Koser states, “is to examine closely the few deals that they've brokered successfully since the recession started.” He calls this process of going back to successful deals and seeing just what made them appealing at an executive-level the “installed base audit.” In this process, the sales team goes back to its most recent and profitable deals and tries to locate the person who was responsible for giving them the green light, the primary decision maker in charge of the prospect's discretionary funds. The sales person then asks him or her a series of questions about the sale, the most important one being: “Why did you choose to buy?” Almost invariably, the answer to this question is that the product either saved the company money or that it boosted profits in some quantifiable way.

Koser argues that because the ability to make the decision to purchase has moved up the chain of command to the executive level, prospects now see the collection of projects that they are currently considering as just so many ROIs. This means that a seller's solution no longer just has to compete against other companies offering similar solutions; it must also compete against every single way that the prospect could possibly choose to spend their discretionary funds. On the one hand, they might choose to purchase a competitor's solution, but they could just as easily invest in a completely unrelated project that just happens to have a better ROI. Or even more likely in this economy, the prospect could simply choose to hold onto their money, simply doing nothing and waiting! Koser argues that the only way for sales people to fight this apathy is by being able to communicate with absolute clarity why their prospects cannot afford not to buy from them.

And he goes on to explain that his ability only comes when the seller is able to demonstrate that the ROI on their solution is better than the ROI of any other project that the prospect is currently considering. To elaborate on his concept, he has coined a special term to refer to the amount of money that a solution will generate above and beyond the ROI of the most promising project that the prospect is currently considering: Sales economic value added (SalesEVA). The power of SalesEVA is that it tells the prospect exactly what they stand to lose by failing to act, even if they were to invest their money in the most profitable project that they are currently considering.

Jeff Koser argues that these two new tools—the installed base audit and SalesEVA—should be at the forefront of any sales organization's attempt to benefit from the ensuing economic recovery. But more importantly, sales needs a revised philosophy, one in which sales organizations cater directly to decision-makers rather than to people working at the operations level.

Selling to Zebras" is being talked about as "…the book may be most valuable to CEO's and General Managers whose companies' performance relies so heavily on the ability of their sales organizations' ability to close deals." -- Kenneth C. McMillan is the CEO of Tartan Management, a TEC Chair, and Vistage member (http://www.vistage.com).

"Jeff and Chad Koser wrote a book that I consider one of the best sales books I have read in the last decade. What made this book interesting was their methodology and process for identifying a company's best prospects. They developed a very scientific analytical model that can be used by any company." -- Marc Kramer, Wharton School of Management

About Jeff Koser and Selling to Zebras, LLC: Jeff is the founder of Selling to Zebras, LLC a sales tools and consulting firm established in 1999 that works with CEOs, top executives, and sales forces of both large and small organizations including: HK Systems, Plunkett Raysich Architects, Serve You Custom Prescription Management, Smart Choice MRI, StarCite, Inc., Thomson Reuters--through it's Sabrix division, Vivisimo, Inc. Jeff and his family live in Hartland, Wisconsin. Koser is the former Chief Operating Officer of Baan USA, Inc's Supply Chain Software Division.

The ZEBRAselling Value Process is based on the award winning book Selling to Zebras HOW to CLOSE 90% of the BUSINESS YOU PURSUE FASTER, MORE EASILY and MORE PROFITABLY. Recognized globally as a leader in sales process improvement Selling to Zebras, LLC provides process efficiency, enabling technology, and proven management support to drive significant sales related improvement.

Contact information: Jeff can be reached @ mobile phone (414) 659-1494, http://www.sellingtozebras.com

###