Omega-3 Supplements May Reduce Risk of Breast Cancer

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Located in Venice, FL, Ambo Health physicians review latest research suggesting omega-3 fish oils may help prevent cancer.

Instead of swallowing multiple capsules, it is easier to use a fresh, pure, liquid omega-3 fish oil.

Even if omega-3 does help prevent cancer, we still need to understand what kind of dose will make a difference.

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Located in Venice, FL, Ambo Health physicians review latest research suggesting omega-3 fish oils may help prevent cancer.

According to a newly released study, omega-3 supplements may reduce the risk of breast cancer.

The study from the Fred Hutchinson Cancer Center represents the most recent news suggesting that omega-3 could be a tool for preventing and fighting cancer.

Following 35,016 post-menopausal women for six years, the study found that the women who took omega-3 supplements had a 32 percent lower risk of developing breast cancer.

While the study does not provide any conclusive evidence that omega-3 wards off cancer, the findings are intriguing in light of earlier omega-3 research.

According to an article published in the Anticancer Agents in Medicinal Chemistry, scientists have found that omega-3 slowed the growth of cancer cells and killed cancer cells in a variety of human cancer strains, including colonic, pancreatic, prostate, and breast cancer. While limited to a petri dish, the findings suggests that omega-3 could produce similar results inside the human body.

Other research found that substituting fish oil for corn oil in the diet slowed the growth of tumors in rodents.

Despite the encouraging findings, more research is needed before scientists can draw a conclusive tie between omega-3 and cancer.

“Even if omega-3 does help prevent cancer,” said Dr. Chalmers, an omega-3 expert and founder of several of fish oil supplement companies, “we still need to understand what kind of a dose will make a difference.”

“Assuming that omega-3 could affect cancer the way it helps relieve arthritis or heart disease, we see that people will need to take more than a capsule a day to experience any difference,” said Dr. Chalmers.

More research is underway. Harvard University has launched a new study to investigate whether fish oil and other vitamin supplements prevent cancer, heart disease, and stroke in older men and women.

While the omega-3 effects on cancer are still murky, nutritionists agree getting enough omega-3 is part of a healthy diet. Experts recommend either eating fatty fish to promote heart health or taking omega-3 supplements.

Sources:

Clarke, Suzan. "Breast Cancer: Can Fish Oil and Omega-3 Fatty Acids Really Reduce the Risk? - ABC News." ABCNews.com - Breaking News, Politics, Online News, World News, Feature Stories, Celebrity Interviews and More - ABC News. 8 July 2010. Web. 12 July 2010.

Norton, Amy. "Fish Oil Might Lower Breast Cancer Risk - ABC News." ABCNews.com - Breaking News, Politics, Online News, World News, Feature Stories, Celebrity Interviews and More - ABC News. 8 July 2010. Web. 12 July 2010.

Wendel, M., and A. Heller. "Anticancer Actions of Omega-3 Fatty Acids--current State and Future Perspectives." PubMed.gov. Web. 12 July 2010.

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Anne-Marie Chalmers
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