Oxfam urges Australians to Help ‘Stop Hunger’ Through a Tax Deductible Donation

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International aid agency Oxfam is calling on Australians to dig deep to help its ‘Stop Hunger’ Appeal reach its target of almost $2 million before the end of the financial year.

Oxfam’s ‘Stop Hunger’ Appeal is being supported by acclaimed chef and author Kylie Kwong, who has challenged Australians to imagine life cooking recipes with only one vegetable.

International aid agency Oxfam is calling on Australians to dig deep to help its [‘Stop Hunger’ Appeal reach its target of almost $2 million before the end of the financial year. Oxfam Australia Executive Director Andrew Hewett said the appeal was aimed at helping people in some of the poorest countries in the world to have enough food to feed their families.

“A recent UN report has predicted that food prices could rise by as much as 40 per cent over the next decade. It’s estimated around a billion people around the world are already undernourished. It is vital that we act now to help stop hunger,” Mr Hewett said. Oxfam works in countries like Timor-Leste, where more than one-third of the population regularly experience food shortages at a time of the year known as the “hungry season”, which often lasts for two to three months. “Oxfam has been training people in Timor-Leste in growing food and nutrition, so that they have enough food to eat and sell, and so that their children can have a healthy diet,” Mr Hewett said. “We know that many Australian families appreciate what it’s like to be confronted with rising food prices, and Oxfam is grateful for the support Australians provide, which allows us to help people in some of the poorest countries in the world.

“We are asking all Australians to try to find a little extra before the end of this financial year and help us do more to try to stop hunger.” [Oxfam’s ‘Stop Hunger’ Appeal is being supported by acclaimed chef and author Kylie Kwong, who has challenged Australians to imagine life cooking recipes with only one vegetable.

“Many poor communities around the world are surviving on only one type of vegetable and are at severe risk of hunger and malnutrition because they do not have access to the diverse range of produce that we take for granted in Australia,” Ms Kwong said. “I passionately believe that by providing people with the skills and knowledge to grow and prepare nutritious food, we can stop hunger.”

  • $50 can provide a health-monitoring kit containing weighing scales and a thermometer to help identify children at risk of malnutrition
  • $80 can give urgent food by providing four families with vegetable seeds and trees, ensuring children have the nutrition they need to survive.
  • $196 can train 28 people in farming techniques to grow a variety of crops and increase yields.

[Donate now All donations over $2 are tax deductibleInternational aid agency Oxfam is calling on Australians to dig deep to help its [‘Stop Hunger’ Appeal reach its target of almost $2 million before the end of the financial year.

Oxfam Australia Executive Director Andrew Hewett said the appeal was aimed at helping people in some of the poorest countries in the world to have enough food to feed their families.

“A recent UN report has predicted that food prices could rise by as much as 40 per cent over the next decade. It’s estimated around a billion people around the world are already undernourished. It is vital that we act now to help stop hunger,” Mr Hewett said.

Oxfam works in countries like Timor-Leste, where more than one-third of the population regularly experience food shortages at a time of the year known as the “hungry season”, which often lasts for two to three months.

“Oxfam has been training people in Timor-Leste in growing food and nutrition, so that they have enough food to eat and sell, and so that their children can have a healthy diet,” Mr Hewett said.

“We know that many Australian families appreciate what it’s like to be confronted with rising food prices, and Oxfam is grateful for the support Australians provide, which allows us to help people in some of the poorest countries in the world.

“We are asking all Australians to try to find a little extra before the end of this financial year and help us do more to try to stop hunger.”

[Oxfam’s ‘Stop Hunger’ Appeal is being supported by acclaimed chef and author Kylie Kwong, who has challenged Australians to imagine life cooking recipes with only one vegetable.

“Many poor communities around the world are surviving on only one type of vegetable and are at severe risk of hunger and malnutrition because they do not have access to the diverse range of produce that we take for granted in Australia,” Ms Kwong said.    

“I passionately believe that by providing people with the skills and knowledge to grow and prepare nutritious food, we can stop hunger.”

  • $50 can provide a health-monitoring kit containing weighing scales and a thermometer to help identify children at risk of malnutrition
  • $80 can give urgent food by providing four families with vegetable seeds and trees, ensuring children have the nutrition they need to survive.
  • $196 can train 28 people in farming techniques to grow a variety of crops and increase yields.

[Donate now

All donations over $2 are tax deductible

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Sunita Bose
Oxfam Australia
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