Recent Study Reports Reveals that HGH May Aid Performance

Researches conducted recently reveal moderate evidence about the effect of HGH on athletes and other users sports performance.

  • Share on TwitterShare on FacebookShare on Google+Share on LinkedInEmail a friend

Copenhagen, Denmark (PRWEB) June 30, 2010

Recent researches have found scientific evidence that proves that human growth hormone can aid to improve a sportsman’s physical performance.

However, few researchers from Denmark revealed that the level of enhancement of performance due to the use of the human growth hormone, among athletes, was fairly small, and was only limited to sprinting. It failed to show considerable results pertaining to increase in fitness or strength. Athletes, who were to be expected to benefit from the use of human growth hormone, are mainly those participating in race events like swimming or running, which necessitate a sudden energy burst, and where even a minute difference in seconds between competitors can ascertain the champion.

The use of human growth hormone along with other various substances has been barred from Olympics as well as from other various sports events in spite of fact that researches still don’t have enough proof that growth hormone is capable of boosting performance at a considerable level. All the earlier studies related to human growth hormone effects on mankind have been trivial and short-lived.

The new study carried out the hgh tests on nearly 100 amateur athletes for a continuous period of two months.

The pituitary gland helps to release human growth hormone in the human body, which supports the development of bone as well as other tissue. It can also be artificially produced, but its application is confined to particular health conditions in kids and grown-ups, such as growth hormone deficiency, suffering from AIDS and short physical stature.

Over the years athletes have used growth hormone extensively thinking that it would assist them in building muscle and to increase performance. Moreover, since the presence of growth hormone in human body is difficult to detect through urine tests, in 2004 blood test was used to confirm its presence.

The newest study was conducted on 103 amateur athletes, who were of 18 to 40 years of age. For two consecutive months, they were given injections of either saline water or human growth hormone. A few of them were also injected with testosterone shots.

All the athletes then performed weight lifting, jumping exercises and rode bicycles to analysis the level of their performance. According to the researches, the use of growth hormone failed to increase potency, force or stamina among the athletes. The only development that was unearthed was in support of bicycle sprinting, where a 4% increase in sprinting speed was noticed.


Contact

  • Hugo G Harris
    HGH Info
    (040) 569-8021
    Email