Combination of Meniscus Allograft Transplantation and Repair of Articular Cartilage May Slow the Progression of Arthritis in the Knee

Stone Research Foundation Publishes Study Results in The British Journal of Bone & Joint Surgery, Showing a 9.9 Year Survival Rate. Success of Less Invasive Procedures for Knee Damage Could Help Lower Skyrocketing Instances of Knee Replacement Surgery

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The goal of biologic knee repair, according to Dr. Stone, is to avoid or forestall knee replacement surgery.

San Francisco, CA (PRWEB) July 7, 2010

Biologic knee repair, rather than bionic (artificial) replacement, may slow the progression of arthritis without limiting the option for future arthroplasty, according to a study by Kevin R. Stone, MD, chairman, the Stone Research Foundation in this month’s issue of The British Journal of Bone & Joint Surgery. These research results could have significant impact on the long-term feasibility of artificial knee replacement - the number of artificial joint replacement surgeries is predicted to increase to 3.4 million by 2030, with proportionate increases in cost. The goal of biologic knee repair, according to Dr. Stone, is to avoid or forestall knee replacement surgery.

The report is based on a study of 119 meniscal allograft transplantations performed concurrently with articular cartilage repair in 115 patients with severe articular cartilage damage. The Kaplan-Meier estimated mean survival time for the whole series was 9.9 years. Loss of the meniscus generates increased forces on the articular cartilage of the knee and other joint structures and increases the risk of the development of arthritis. The appropriate treatment for loss of the meniscus with unicompartmental arthritis remains controversial, with treatments including osteotomy, unicompartmental (UKR) or total knee replacement. The study was approved by an independent Institutional Review Board. The study abstract is available via The British Journal of Bone & Joint Surgery.

Co-authors of the study with Dr. Stone are Ann W. Walgenbach, RNNP; Wendy Adelson, MS; Jonathan Pelsis, MHP; and Tom Turek of The Stone Research Foundation, San Francisco.

About The Stone Research Foundation:
The Stone Research Foundation is an independent, public, non-profit research institute based in San Francisco. Its mission is to research and develop ways to prevent, treat, and reverse arthritis and joint injuries. More info is available at http://www.stoneresearch.org.

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PDF - Journal of Bone & Joint Surgery

PDF of the study abstract from the British Journal of Bone & Joint Surgery