MicroStrain Expands Integration with National Instruments’ Labview and Emphasizes Commitment to Open Architecture Throughout its Sensors

Share Article

MicroStrain and National Instruments have joined to offer their customers LabVIEW Drivers for the MicroStrain accelerometers and strain gauge sensor nodes including the G-Link®, SG-Link®, and SG-Link® OEM. This integration allows MicroStrain customers to rapidly create and customize data acquisition applications using LabVIEW.

MicroStrain Inc, a leading developer and manufacturer of microminiature sensors and advanced wireless systems, announced enhanced integration of its G-Link® and SG-Link® sensor products with National Instruments’ LabVIEW graphical system design software.

This integration allows MicroStrain customers including engineers, universities and manufacturers to rapidly create and customize data acquisition applications using LabVIEW. “We are committed to open architecture and offer free software developer kits throughout our sensor range. This latest integration further expands the number of our sensors that can seamlessly connect to LabVIEW to facilitate data acquisition, graphical display, analysis and data storage,” said Steven Arms, President of MicroStrain.

MicroStrain is particularly known for its innovations in very small, durable sensors with embedded microprocessors. The product range covers displacement, inertial and wireless, with the recent addition of energy harvesting, an area that MicroStrain has made great inroads with the work undertaken for the US Navy in helicopter structural health monitoring. These innovations are now being added to the commercial product range.

“Integrating with MicroStrain’s award-winning sensors enables LabVIEW users to develop wireless acceleration and strain systems within the same software environment that engineers and scientists are using today for wired measurement systems,” said Robert Jackson, Senior Product Manager in Product Partner Development at National Instruments.

MicroStrain Sensors
MicroStrain’s G-Link® Wireless Accelerometer Node (http://microstrain.com/g-link.aspx) contains two orthogonally mounted, dual-axis MEMS accelerometers for measuring acceleration on its X, Y and Z axes.

MicroStrain’s SG-Link® Wireless Strain Node (http://microstrain.com/sg-link.aspx) provides a differential input channel (strain channel) primarily designed to support strain gauges of 350 ohm resistance or greater, and a single ended input channel (analog channel) designed to support 0-3 volt sensors. The combination of the two measurement channels supports a wide range of Wheatstone bridge and analog sensors including strain gauges, displacement sensors, load cells, torque transducers, pressure sensors, accelerometers, geophones, temperature sensors and inclinometers.

About MicroStrain Inc
MicroStrain, Inc (http://www.microstrain.com) is a leading manufacturer of inertial measurement systems, micro-displacement transducers and wireless sensing networks. MicroStrain’s sensing systems are used in a wide variety of applications, including testing new designs, controlling critical processes, navigating unmanned vehicles, and monitoring the health of structures and machines. Recognized as an innovator in the sensors industry, MicroStrain has received 9 Best of Sensors Expo Gold awards for its new products.

About National Instruments
National Instruments (http://www.ni.com) is transforming the way engineers and scientists design, prototype and deploy systems for measurement, automation and embedded applications. NI empowers customers with off-the-shelf software such as NI LabVIEW and modular cost-effective hardware, and sells to a broad base of more than 30,000 different companies worldwide, with no one customer representing more than 3 percent of revenue and no one industry representing more than 15 percent of revenue. Headquartered in Austin, Texas, NI has more than 5,000 employees and direct operations in more than 40 countries.

LabVIEW, National Instruments, NI and ni.com are trademarks of National Instruments.

###

Share article on social media or email:

View article via:

Pdf Print

Contact Author

Rebecca Corneau
Visit website