UK Gardens Worth an Average of £825, Says Confused.com

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Survey reveals most valuable garden-based possessions.

Gardens are more prone to theft and damage during the summer and it's likely householders are undervaluing their garden contents in the same way they do their household contents.

Brits' gardens are worth an average of £825, a study has revealed. Lawnmowers and strimmers, sheds and greenhouses and patio furniture topped the league of most expensive items in the UK's gardens.

Almost two thirds of the population owns a BBQ and 22% have a vegetable patch; but only 2% of the UK has a hot tub in their garden. Almost a third of Brits admit to spending more money on their garden than any other area of their house, and three quarters of the UK prefer the garden to any other area of the home.

The study was conducted by price comparison site http://www.confused.com

Darren Black, head of home insurance for the company, said: "The nation is certainly more 'Good Life' than 'Footballers Wives' as we'd rather spend time with a bag of fertilizer than in a tub of bubbles."

"While the green-fingered can't insure their carrots and spuds, it is important they think about all those other things in their garden when buying house insurance. Many assume their garden's contents are covered under home insurance when this is not always the case. The cost of replacing these items if they were stolen or damaged could be significant.

"Gardens are more prone to theft and damage during the summer and it's likely householders are undervaluing their garden contents in the same way they do their household contents."

Items included in the average value of the UK's gardens included garden tools worth £141, sheds and greenhouses worth £123 and patio furniture valued at £121. Brits also listed ponds and water features worth an average of £38, BBQs at £64 and decking at £104.

Researchers polled 3000 people between the ages of 16 and 65 living the length and breadth of the country.

The report revealed Brits also have a fondness for garden accessories with 34% admitting to decorating the garden with ornaments. Parents said they housed over £50 worth of kids' toys in gardens and have spent on average £111 on flowers, plants and seeds.

Top 10 garden items

1. Tables and chairs
2. Flowers and plants
3. BBQ
4. Lawnmower
5. Shed
6. Ornaments
7. Strimmer
8. Solar lights/garden lights
9. Sun loungers
10. Vegetable patch

Top 5 most expensive items

Lawnmowers - average value £141
Sheds and Greenhouses - average value £123
Patio furniture - average value £121
Decking - average value £103
Flowers/Plants/Seeds - average value £111

For further information please contact:
Press Office, Confused.com 02920 434 398

Notes to editors
Research conducted by OnePoll during June 2010 amongst 3,000 homeowners

About Confused.com:
Confused.com is one of the UK's biggest and most popular price comparison services. Launched in 2002, it generates over two million quotes per month. It has expanded its range of comparison products over the last couple of years to include home insurance, travel insurance, pet insurance, van insurance, motorbike insurance, breakdown cover and energy, as well as financial services products including credit cards, loans, mortgages and life insurance.

Confused.com is not a supplier, insurance company or broker. It provides a free, objective and unbiased comparison service. By using cutting-edge technology, it has developed a series of intelligent web-based solutions that evaluate a number of risk factors to help customers with their decision-making, subsequently finding them great deals on a wide-range of insurance products, financial services, utilities and more. Confused.com's service is based on the most up-to-date information provided by UK suppliers and industry regulators.

Confused.com is owned by the Admiral Group plc. Admiral listed on the London Stock Exchange in September 2004. Confused.com is regulated by the FSA.

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