Research Study Finds Disparity In Calcium Efficacy

Share Article

-Scientists uncover marked differences in ability to build human bone cells-

Researchers at Harvard Medical School and the University of Connecticut have discovered differences in the abilities of various forms of calcium to effectively build human bone cells. The study was published in the July 2010 issue of the journal, Molecular and Cellular Biochemistry.

According to Manashi Bagchi, Ph.D., FACN, "We were startled by the results because of the widespread belief that there are no significant differences among calciums. This is the first time such a study has been undertaken and our findings were the opposite of implications drawn from past research."        

The researchers focused on three different forms of calcium and compared each in terms of proliferation, mineralization and oxidative stress in human osteoblast cells. Calcium carbonate, calcium citrate and a relatively new calcium derived from marine algae were tested.

Study findings showed the algae calcium increased alkaline phosphatase activity (a measure of mineralization) 200 percent more effectively than calcium carbonate and 250 percent better than calcium citrate.

Results of DNA synthesis testing - the ability of the osteoblasts to produce new bone-building cells - demonstrated the efficacy of algae calcium exceeded calcium carbonate by 300 percent and calcium citrate by 400 percent respectively.

"Previous studies that were started years ago with findings that were released just recently do not account for such dramatic discrepancies because they only studied one form of calcium," said Dr. Bagchi. "We investigated three and the variation in the results between the calcium carbonate, calcium citrate and marine algae calcium are significant."

Readers interested in reviewing a copy of the study should visit http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/20213262. For more information about marine algae calcium, visit http://www.algaecal.com or http://www.algaemin.com.

EDITORS: To learn more about the study, please call Nancy Trent or Pam Wadler at 212-966-0024 or email pam(at)trentandcompany(dot)com.

###

Share article on social media or email:

View article via:

Pdf Print

Contact Author

NANCY TRENT
Trent & Company
2129660024 ext. 20
Email >
Visit website