‘Tell Me Pretty Baby’ – Was it Elvis’ Lost Recording?

Share Article

Music producer Andy Jackson was intrigued when a woman looking to make a deal on his used car lot in 1977 in a Dallas suburb mentioned her father’s long-ago recording session with Elvis. Jackson met the bass player and writer of “Tell Me Pretty Baby” -- and knew, when he heard the recording, this is ‘The King!’

News Image
I am aware that 'Tell Me Pretty Baby,' the song, has been the subject of much controversy. I found Without the King's Consent, the book, personally fascinating.

‘Tell Me Pretty Baby’ – was it Elvis’ lost recording?

‘Without the King’s Consent’ is a new bit of history on Elvis’s early years – and a story of conflict
ARLINGTON, Texas – Music producer Andy Jackson was intrigued when a woman looking to make a deal on his used car lot in 1977 in a Dallas suburb mentioned her father’s long-ago recording session with Elvis. Jackson met the bass player and writer of “Tell Me Pretty Baby” -- and knew, when he heard the recording, this is ‘The King!’

But discovering an early 1954 recording that some claim is Elvis Presley’s lost song opened a decades-long mystery and conflict between record companies and producers, Elvis’s representatives, and Jackson and his partners. Without the King’s Consent published by Trafford Publishing, by Andrew Jackson and Frederick Allen, tells the story.

Pete Falco, bass player and leader of the Red Dots, wrote “Tell Me Pretty Baby,” and remembers the day the 19-year-old singer showed up at the hall he was playing in Arizona. Falco offers him $15 to sing for the demo. Falco joined Jackson in 1977 to form International Classic Productions with a plan to produce and market the newly discovered recording, but like lots of business partnerships, it fell apart, in the midst of Elvis’s untimely death and fueled by the staunch opposition and impending legal action. Jackson turned down a $500,000 offer from RCA for the song, but meantime, 25,000 records were produced. The story of the song’s discovery became international news, and radio stations aired the song continuously, inviting listeners to judge whether “Tell Me Pretty Baby” was indeed the King’s voice. Drawn into court by RCA, despite eyewitness and expert testimony, a jury eventually agreed with RCA that the recording was deceptive and fraudulent, and that Elvis did not sing “Tell Me Pretty Baby.” Jackson was required to halt all sales of the record and pay RCA $100,000 in damages. Yet, many still believe in the authenticity of “Tell Me Pretty Baby” and find the tale believable. Dick Clark said “I am aware that ‘Tell Me Pretty Baby,’ the song, has been the subject of much controversy. I found Without the King’s Consent, the book, personally fascinating.”

With Aug. 16, 2010 marking the 33rd anniversary of the King’s death, is Jackson sitting on a gold mine, with a “Mystery Artist” recording, marking the birth of rock and roll?

About the Authors
Andrew Jackson is a songwriter, music producer and publisher, affiliated with Broadcast Music Incorporated, and has produced numerous studio recordings since 1968. His two most recent productions, “To Rachel With Love” and “Here Comes Old Hickory,” are scheduled for release soon. He lives in Texas, as does writer Frederick Allen.

Trafford Publishing is the premier book publisher for emerging, self-published authors. For more information, please visit Trafford publishing.

###

Share article on social media or email:

View article via:

Pdf Print

Contact Author

Teresa Hale
Trafford Publishing
1-888-232-4444 ext 5
Email >
Visit website