5 “PLEASE ROB ME” Signs Apartment Renters Often Post

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Burglars use these 5 signs to quickly scope apartments. Many renters don’t know that apartments are 85% more likely to be robbed according to the National Crime Prevention Council. The checklist below will help renters achieve greater apartment security.

Apartments are 85% more likely to be robbed according to the National Crime Prevention Council

Burglars use these 5 signs to quickly scope apartments. Many renters don’t know that apartments are 85% more likely to be robbed according to the National Crime Prevention Council. The checklist below will help renters achieve greater apartment security.

1. Mailbox name-tags reveal if anyone is home and alone.

Burglars look for a mailbox with one name on it. Why? Because a single person’s living arrangement, and likelihood of being at home is easily read by a burglar by just standing in your apartment building’s mail area. To a thief this means they can easily identify which apartments are empty during the day. Women living alone have particular cause for concern, as a creep will know she’s home alone at night.

Add some random names to your mailbox, so that burglars feel less sure that your apartment is “easy pickings.”

2. The lack of a peephole offers opportunity.

Peepholes are a critical piece of apartment security against unknown people trying to get into your apartment. Burglars see no peephole and they know they are free to say “flower delivery” or “maintenance” to gain access to an apartment.

3. Mail piling up says "apartment is empty."

Mail piling up around entry hall mailboxes or in front of apartment doors is a tell-tale sign that the apartment is vacant. It’s important for renters to have a friend or neighbor collect the mail for them, when they are out of town.

4. A dark window screams "off on vacation."

Imagine what a burglar sees when looking up at an apartment complex at night: some lights on, some lights off, a flickering TV set. A dark window tells them there is a good chance the place is empty. A darkened apartment, night-after-night, sends the message “Off on vacation.”

A low voltage, highly energy efficient lamp, strategically placed near a window facing the street is a good way to keep an apartment off a burglar’s target list.

5. Windows with Fire Escapes provide great cover and are often UNLOCKED.

Most burglars don’t even have to use force. 33% of burglaries are unforced according the the FBI’s Uniform Crime Reporting database. Renters often forget to lock windows near a fire escape, which are often not visible via the street, providing easy cover. All windows should be locked especially these.

Of course renters who really want to be safe should consider getting a professionally monitored security system. For 100 years now renters have been locked out of security by alarm companies that require 3 year contracts and high installation fees.

SimpliSafe Inc. serves renters with high tech a wireless home security system that starts at $199 and is professionally monitored 24/7 for just $14.99 per month. The company never requires a contract; rather it provides alarm-monitoring services on a month-to-month basis.

SimpliSafe’s portable burglar alarm finally gives renters the ability to take their system with them to their next abode. The company made another ingenious choice in it’s security system’s design: each system comes equipped with a SIM card and cellular-alarm-transmitter, so apartment renters don’t need a phoneline to have their alarm signals reach SimpliSafe’s 24/7 alarm-monitoring center.

About SimpliSafe

SimpliSafe is a simple, secure and complete apartment alarm. Using entirely wireless components, the alarm system can be easily customized and self-installed by a renter or homeowner, and is portable for use at the owner's next residence. The system connects to a 24-hour Emergency Dispatch Center using a built-in cellular module. SimpliSafe Inc. is headquartered in Boston, Massachusetts. For more information, visit http://simplisafe.com or call 1-888-957-4675.

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Melina Martinez
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