Registered Nurses Are Still Earning High Salaries Despite Bad Economy

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Data compiled from the Bureau of Labor Statistics shows surprising salary figures and job outlook for registered nurses.

“I chose nursing because I wanted to help people. My mother was a nurse, and I would occasionally volunteer at her work. I saw first-hand how you can really make a difference in people’s lives. The salary and benefits are just icing on the cake.”

As the economy continues its sluggish recovery, at least one profession is still enjoying steady employment rates and competitive salaries: Registered nursing (RN). According to the latest data acquired from the Bureau of Labor Statistics, the average registered nurse salary in the Unites States is $63,750. That is up almost $7,000 from the average RN salary rates just five years ago--despite the economic slowdown.

This data may not be surprising to some economists, given the relatively recession-proof nature of nursing and the medical field. While an economic downturn can affect all professions (and even governments), healthcare typically manages to do better than other occupations. In addition to the competitive salaries, the future job outlook of an RN looks even better.

According to the Bureau of Labor Statistics, registered nursing will be one of the fastest growing career opportunities from 2008-2018, with an estimated 22 percent increase in employment demand throughout that period. This will result in approximately 581,500 new jobs--the highest figure among all occupations.

It is important to note that while registered nursing will be one of the fastest growing professions in the years to come, not all RN positions will grow as rapidly within each industry. For example, statistics show that offices of physicians could hire 48 percent of those new RNs, while hospitals may hire as few as 17 percent.

Even without the positive salary data & job outlook, registered nursing has long been a popular profession. According to Sarah Routhe, an RN and owner of the website Registered Nurse RN, “I chose nursing because I wanted to help people. My mother was a nurse, and I would occasionally volunteer at her work. I saw first-hand how you can really make a difference in people’s lives. The salary and benefits are just icing on the cake.”

To become an RN, individuals are required to obtain the necessary educational requirements set forth by each state. For most states, you can complete these requirements in as little as two years. Most colleges and universities offer two year or four-year degrees in nursing. After completing the educational requirements, each individual must pass a certification test with the state before they can practice as a nurse.

Sarah Routhe is an RN who also runs a website & blog. She has written many tips and insights for registered nurses and nursing students. For more information, visit RegisteredNurseRn.com. You can also view detailed average salary and wage statistics for your individual state.

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Sarah Routhe

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