Author Challenges Definitions of Addiction and Recovery

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New recovery advocacy group promotes the proven fact that people can and do permanently recover without relapse and without the stigma of being labeled with a disease.

The New Face of Recovery

Addicts are not hopelessly diseased for life...They are not powerless, but instead must become empowered to regain control over their lives. This is a message that should be included in National Recovery Month."

September is National Alcohol and Drug Addiction Recovery Month. It is an annual observance now in its 21st celebration with this year's theme being "Now More than Ever!" Each year recovery advocates, treatment specialists and rehabilitation facilities hold events, rallies and walks in support of ending addiction.

However, most addicts and treatment professionals have been lead to believe that addiction is an incurable brain disease and that relapse is a part of the recovery process, yet neither of these statements are proven facts. On the contrary, millions of people throughout the world are able to put addiction behind them forever without relapse and you would have no way of detecting they ever had an addiction unless they told you.

"The definitions of addiction and recovery are often simply regurgitated from some behind-the-scenes source with its own agenda that is often tied to en affort to make money off the plight of others," remarks Lucas A Catton, CCDC, who is the author of the recently released book titled The New Face of Recovery: Unlabeling Addiction as a Disease and Finding Treatments that Work. "If you trace back who really benefits from saying addiction is incurable it leads to ineffective treatment protocols and drug companies seeking to profit by marketing new drugs."

Catton has been working in many areas of the prevention and drug rehab field for more than a decade and his book outlines the principles of The New Face of Recovery movement that has worked to help thousands of people find solutions for substance abuse problems. As a former addict himself, he has spent many years researching studies and methods to identify approaches that work with successful applications.

"Addicts are not hopelessly diseased for life," says Catton, "There must be accountability for results in recovery programs and people must learn to take responsibility for their condition. They are not powerless, but instead must become empowered to regain control over their lives. This is a message that should be included in National Recovery Month."

For more information, or to find help for a loved one in need visit http://www.newfaceofrecovery.org.

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