Author of 'My #1 Is Still My #1' Says 9-11 Mosque Rallies Could Help Grieving Families

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Widow shares personal story of how confronting her enemies helped her recover from grief after losing her husband and daughter simultaneously.

Bernice Bright Dickey learned she had to forgive God after half her family died at the same time.

Instead of rallying for or against the mosque, those same groups can come together and use that energy to talk about their unresolved issues over the loss of their loved ones,” Dickey said.

When Bernice Bright Dickey fostered the courage to share her pain with the people who hurt her, she said she instantly began to feel relief from the grief of losing her husband and oldest daughter in a tragic car accident.

Because of her experience recovering from grief, the Sugar Land resident said 9-11 mosque rallies can be opportunities for grieving families to confront pain and find healing.

“Instead of rallying for or against the mosque, those same groups can come together and use that energy to talk about their unresolved issues over the loss of their loved ones,” Dickey said.

Although 9-11 had happened months before, Dickey said she felt the weight of the Twin Towers falling on her Jan. 31, 2002, when her husband and oldest daughter were hit by a train and killed. Her youngest daughter survived with second and third degree burns covering one side of her body and face. But it was the aftermath of being neglected and mistreated by religious leaders that left her in an even further state of dire shock. To recover from her grief, she would first have to deal with her anger.

“Having a face-to-face conference with the church leaders who had offended me by their actions was the first step towards healing in my grief journey,” she said. “When I focused on my offenders, it took up a lot of energy that should have been redirected toward my own grief recovery.”

Dickey said that she instantly began to feel relief from her grief after the meeting. The most important thing she had to do was to forgive them and remember that she still had a life to live, she said.

“I realized that in order for me to move on and to release the negative emotions that were becoming toxic to me, I had to forgive everyone I was angry with: God, my late husband, and the church leaders,” Dickey said. “I wanted my surviving daughter to have her remaining parent emotionally healthy. After all, she had lost half her family as well, and she needed me to be healed, whole and mentally present for her.”

Bernice Bright Dickey is an inspirational speaker and author of My # 1 Is Still My #1, her true story of healing from grief. She is also the owner of BRIGHT Educational Resources, where she uses her experience as a leader in education to consult school districts, leaders and teachers.

For more information or to schedule an interview with Bernice Bright Dickey, please contact Monica L. Coleman at bbdickey(at)juno(dot)com or call 832-361-2304. Follow updates on Bernice Bright Dickey on Facebook.

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