Pen and Paper Note Taking in Classrooms has Outlived its Usefulness

One by one, old traditions are changing with technology, but note taking by students in schools hasn’t changed yet. According to Professor Toni Krasnic, author of the newly released book Concise Learning, pen and paper note taking in classrooms needs to be reexamined because it still exists out of tradition, not because it’s the best way. Concise Learning shows how students can use mind maps to significantly improve their note taking, engagement with schoolwork, thinking, creativity, learning, and grades.

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Alexandria, VA (PRWEB) September 15, 2010

One by one, old traditions are changing with technology, but note taking by students in schools hasn’t changed yet. According to Professor Toni Krasnic, author of the newly released book Concise Learning, pen and paper note taking in classrooms needs to be reexamined because it still exists out of tradition, not because it’s the best way. Concise Learning shows how students can use mind maps to significantly improve their note taking, engagement with schoolwork, thinking, creativity, learning, and grades.

Digital technology has come a long way in recent years, including in the classroom. We now have digital boards, digital presentations, digital books, and yet, students still take pen and paper notes. Why?

“Primarily because of tradition,” notes Professor Krasnic, author of Concise Learning (http://conciselearning.com/book.html), a book on how to learn using mind maps. For hundreds of years, teachers wrote on chalk boards during lectures and students took notes in their notebooks, copying words simply in an effort to remember them. The teacher’s writing speed was equally matched by the writing speed of the student. This busy work didn’t allow much thinking time in lectures, but everybody was busy doing something.

Krasnic believes pen and paper note taking has been taken for granted for far too long and needs a major revamp. He notes that students communicate digitally almost everywhere, except during lecture. Krasnic poses a number of questions to make his point: “Why still write on paper when there’s a very effective digital way of note taking? Why copy every word when research clearly shows the focus should be on key concepts? Why have many different sets of paper notes when you can have just one set of integrated notes? More importantly, why continue the tradition of simply replicating information when students could use digital note taking to meaningfully organize and connect information, fostering thinking and learning?”

This new way of digital, more effective note taking is called mind mapping. Mind mapping is a powerful and fun tool that enables visual mapping of information. When mind mapping, students whole-mindedly filter and break down unprocessed information to key concepts (analysis) and then organize and connect key concepts back together (synthesis) in a personally meaningful way. This active process of note taking eliminates the redundancy of just copying information, which, unlike mind mapping, doesn’t encourage interaction, thinking, creativity, or learning. “From the first time I tried mind mapping, it forever revolutionized how I manage information, how I think, how I solve problems, and how I learn,” Krasnic says.

Mind mapping is being successfully practiced by millions of students and business professionals who dared to think differently and who were adventurous enough to try it. Their rewards are not only better notes at the end of the process, but better engagement with information throughout the process, resulting in enhanced thinking, understanding, recall, problem solving, creativity, and learning. When will you give it a try?

Contact the author for interviews or review copies. Visit http://conciselearning.com/media.html for book cover art, pictures, news pegs, sample chapters, and book reviews. The book retails for $29.95, is available through Ingram and Baker & Taylor, and can be purchased in bookstores, college bookstores, on Amazon, through iBooks, at the author’s website, and by calling 1-800-247-6553.

About:

Toni Krasnic (http://conciselearning.com/author.html) is a student success coach, mind mapping expert, and the author of Concise Learning: Learn More & Score Higher in Less Time with Less Effort, which helps students learn how to learn and be successful. A former professor of chemistry with nearly a decade of college-level teaching experience at both two-year and four-year institutions, he is a trusted voice on learning and student success.

Book Launch Promotion: free 6-month trial of Seavus DropMind

As a bonus, each book also comes with a FREE 6-month trial of DropMind or ConceptDraw MindMap, two leading mind mapping programs on the market. To get your free access code, simply e-mail the author at profTK@conciselearning.com with your proof of book purchase and program preference.

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