Ghost Pepper Used In Hot Sauce and Hand Grenades

Share Article

"We've taken a pepper that's used in India for crowd control and to keep Elephants out of villages and made it into a searingly hot, but tasty sauce," says Brian Hooks, owner of Ghost Pepper.

Ghost Pepper has taken the world's hottest pepper, the Bhut Jolokia, and created one of the world's hottest sauces, Ghost Pepper Hot Sauce.

"We've taken a pepper that's used in India for crowd control and to keep Elephants out of villages and made it into a searingly hot, but tasty sauce," says Brian Hooks, owner of Ghost Pepper.

Make no mistake, however, this is an extreme hot sauce. Even though it has been tempered with Carrots, Papayas, Lime Juice, Onions and Passion Fruit, it must be handled with caution and used in micro-droplets.

Grown in India's northeastern region, the Bhut Jolokia or Ghost Pepper, is over 200 times stronger than the Jalapeno. Bhut means ghost and those who have eaten it say that the chili is aptly named. It would scare even a spirit away. Eating a Bhut Jolokia is an all-out assault on the senses.

In 2005, Paul Bosland, a professor at the New Mexico State University in the US, tested the Bhut Jolokia and found that it measured a scorching 1,041,427 Scoville units. A Scoville unit is the amount of dilution a chili needs before it becomes undetectable. The Ghost Pepper needs over 1 million drops of water.

Ghost Pepper hot sauce can be used sparingly to instantly kick up the heat in any dish. The Caribbean flavors of Papaya and Passion Fruit make it a natural for citrus glazes or sweet salsas like pineapple and mango.

"We've had many repeat customers who will try a bottle and then buy several more for friends or relatives that really appreciate the heat," adds Hooks.

For additional information on Ghost Pepper Hot Sauce, contact Brian Hooks or visit http://www.GhostPepper.com.

###

Share article on social media or email:

View article via:

Pdf Print

Contact Author

Brian Hooks
Visit website