Survey Reveals Potential Impact of Age Discrimination on Unemployment

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Poll Reveals Most Unemployed for Over One Year

Candidates, news organizations and others automatically label it as age discrimination because it is easy to do, but going deeper may reveal other contributing factors.

IMPACT Hiring Solutions has announced results of a recently conducted poll of 912 LinkedIn members clearly proving that unemployment is not getting better for older professionals.

"The only question asked was, 'How long have you been unemployed and looking for a job?' Since the LinkedIn community is made up primarily of business professionals, one can draw the conclusion that the majority of the people responding have a college degree, include all functional departments within a company, and that the respondents range from entry level professionals to the CEO suite," said Brad Remillard, noted hiring expert, speaker, author and co-founder of IMPACT Hiring Solutions.

A summary of the results shows length of time unemployed as: 9 percent under 60 days; 18 percent 3-6 months; 12 percent 7-9 months; 9 percent 9-12 months; and over half, 52 percent, unemployed for over one year.

Breaking these numbers down further, 39 percent of the respondents were female and 61 percent were male. There was almost no difference between females and males out of work for more than a year with 52 percent for females and 51 percent for males. The other lengths of time were also very similar between females and males.

Of those responding in the 18-24 age range, 50 percent have been unemployed for more than a year, 11 percent between 7-12 months, 22 percent for 3-6 months and 17 percent for less than 60 days.

Of those responding between 25-34 years old, 41 percent were unemployed more than one year, 22 percent between 7 – 12 months, 19 percent for 3 -6 months, and 18 percent for less than 60 days.

In the 35-54 age range, 49 percent have been unemployed more than one year, 21 percent between 7 -12 months, 19 percent for 3-6 months, and 11 percent for less than 60 days.

Of those responding who are 55 and older, 55 percent were unemployed for more than one year, 23 percent between 7-12 months, 16 percent 3 -6 months, and 6 percent less than 60 days.

"It doesn’t surprise me that the largest number of people unemployed for more than a year is in the over 55 age group. I would expect this to be the case, said Remillard.

"I believe there in fact maybe some age discrimination, but other factors contribute to the over 55-plus being the largest group out of work for over one year. Candidates, news organizations and others automatically label it as age discrimination because it is easy to do, but going deeper may reveal other contributing factors. Granted, there may be some age discrimination going on, but for the most part this age group is the highest paid group and the most senior on the corporate ladder. It is for these reasons I believe this is the largest group," he said.

Remillard's Career Blog, featuring up-to-the-minute job search tips and advice, can be found at http://impacthiringsolutions.com/careerblog/.

About IMPACT Hiring Solutions
IMPACT Hiring Solutions is a nationally recognized retained executive search firm focused on uncovering the mistakes, problems, pitfalls related to finding, assessing, hiring, and retaining top talent. The partners have worked together over two decades on performing over 1,500 search assignments, interviewing over 50,000 candidates, tracking successful careers throughout a quarter of century, and conducting deep research into the fundamental errors that hiring executives and managers, candidates, and recruiters make in the hiring process. This extensive and deep research can be found in their research project, "The Top Ten Hiring Mistakes," and in their books, "You're Not the Person I Hired" and "This is NOT the Job I Accepted – Executive Recruiters Share The Inside Secrets How to Reduce Your Time in Transition." For more information, visit http://www.impacthiringsolutions.com.

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