Clean Diesel Has Played a Key Role in the Success of Clean Air Act; EPA Commemorates 40th Anniversary of Landmark Act

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“The diesel industry is proud to have been a part of the history of the Clean Air Act, its implementation, and most importantly, the results in making America’s air cleaner while growing the economy." - Allen Schaeffer, DTF Executive Director

Congratulations to EPA and Congressional leaders for the landmark achievements and success the Clean Air Act has achieved over the past 40 years.

Allen Schaeffer, the executive director of the Diesel Technology Forum, issued the following statement today highlighting the role of clean diesel in the ongoing success of the Clean Air Act. Schaeffer made his comments after attending today’s activities in Washington, D.C. hosted by the Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) commemorating the 40th anniversary of the Act.

“Congratulations to EPA and Congressional leaders for the landmark achievements and success the Clean Air Act has achieved over the past 40 years."

“While we still have much more to accomplish, it’s fitting to honor and commemorate the important environmental gains we have accomplished since the Act was initiated in 1970."

“The diesel industry is proud to have been a part of the history of the Act, its implementation, and most importantly, the results in making America’s air cleaner while growing the economy."

“Diesel has been the primary power in America’s economic growth and a major part of the clean air success story. Because of the Clean Air Act and the cooperative working relationship of the EPA, environmental and health organizations, the diesel industry, and local government agencies, remarkable improvements have been achieved that has resulted in today’s clean diesel technology. It powers the nation’s trucks, construction equipment, farm equipment, ships, locomotives and buses, which today meet the most stringent emissions standards in the world."

“Along with taking lead out of gasoline, a hallmark success story of the Act has been the introduction of new ultra-low sulfur diesel fuel that has enabled the development of more efficient engines and emissions control technologies. Taken together, clean diesel fuel and the emissions control improvements and advanced engine technologies today allow diesel engines to be near zero in emissions."

“In some parts of the United States, the air that goes into the diesel engines will be dirtier than the exhaust that comes out."

“The Clean Air Act established important guideposts and a framework that are still as vital today as they were upon enactment. Flexibility and certainty in establishment and pursuit of new lower engine emissions levels, along with appropriate phase-in and timeframes for introducing new fuels and technologies have played a key role in meeting significant technology challenges."

“At the same time, the Clean Air Act and EPA have enabled exploration of innovative programs like the voluntary incentive-based Diesel Emissions Reduction Program, which has been wildly successful in delivering more than $13 in health and environmental benefits for every $1 of investment."

“These are significant accomplishments, but we’re not done yet. We are continuing to phase in new cleaner diesel fuels and emissions standards in off-road machines and equipment, while also moving to meet the next challenge to reduce carbon dioxide emissions."

“Like the Clean Air Act, diesel technology has been around a while, but diesel power has undergone continuous improvement - a transformation that makes it better positioned today to meet the challenges of tomorrow.”

The Diesel Technology Forum is a non-profit organization dedicated to promoting clean diesel technologies. Forum members include engine and vehicle manufacturers, diesel fuel refiners, and manufacturers of emissions control devices. For more information about the Forum, visit our web site at http://www.dieselforum.org.

Contact:
Steve Hansen
(301) 668-7230
shansen(at)dieselforum(dot)org

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