Plastic Surgery 2010 News Briefs -- Selected Research to be Presented on Monday, October 4

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Note: All news briefs are embargoed until the date listed beneath each headline.

Plastic Surgery 2010 News Briefs are designed to keep you up-to-date on embargoed studies and other news being presented at the annual meeting of the American Society of Plastic Surgeons (ASPS) held October 1-5 in Toronto. All briefs are embargoed until the date they are presented. To obtain an advance copy of study abstracts, for media registration, or to arrange interviews with presenters, please contact ASPS Public Relations at (847) 228-9900, media (at) plasticsurgery.org or in Toronto, Oct. 2-5 (416) 585-3870.

  •     LIPOSUCTION PERFORMED WITH TUMMY TUCK DOES NOT INCREASE MAJOR COMPLICATIONS, STUDY FINDS

(Embargo for Release: Monday, October 4, 2010)

Liposuction is frequently performed at the same time as a tummy tuck to improve contouring and provide better cosmetic results. While liposuction has an excellent safety record when performed alone, there’s been debate over whether combining it with a tummy tuck affects patient safety and outcomes. A new study, presented at the ASPS Plastic Surgery 2010 conference, Oct. 1-5, in Toronto, found no increase in life-threatening complications when combining liposuction with tummy tucks. The authors looked at 1,008 patients who had liposuction of the flanks or abdominal wall at the same time as a tummy tuck. Although major complications were not affected, the likelihood of minor complications in these patients was increased. However, the authors conclude that combining the two procedures helps plastic surgeons better sculpt the body and can improve aesthetic results, especially in the lateral hip area, which can be difficult to address with a tummy tuck alone. Overall, liposuction and tummy tucks are safe and effective procedures that allow surgeons to improve body contouring leading to better results.

By the Numbers:
-Nearly 120,000 tummy tucks were performed in 2009, up 84 percent since 2000, according to ASPS statistics.
-Tummy tuck was the fifth most popular cosmetic surgical procedure performed last year.

Study: “Liposuction of the Flanks and Abdomen During Cosmetic Abdominoplasty, Safe or Sorry?” is being presented Mon., Oct. 4, 9:30-9:35AM EDT, at the Metro Toronto Convention Centre.

  • MOST PEOPLE AGREE, THE BEST SCAR IS THE ONE YOU CAN’T SEE

(Embargo for Release: Monday, October 4, 2010)

Upper arm lifts have become a popular procedure to rejuvenate the upper arm and eliminate sagging skin. However, the biggest hurdle of the procedure remains the undesirable, visible scarring. A study presented at the ASPS Plastic Surgery 2010 conference, Oct. 1-5, in Toronto, found that the majority of people find a straight scar placed on the inner arm, as opposed to the back of the arm, is the most aesthetically pleasing option when performing upper arm lift surgery. In the study, photographs of a model with various digitally created scars were produced. An online survey with the photos was sent to 117 people in the general public, 10 plastic surgeons, and 9 people who had or went for an upper arm lift consultation. Across all of those surveyed, a straight scar placed on the inner arm, in the bicep groove, was the most acceptable, less visible option, of scar location for an arm lift.

By the Numbers:
-Nearly 15,000 upper arm lifts were performed in 2009, up 3 percent since 2008, according to ASPS statistics.

Study: “Optimal Placement of Brachioplasty Scar: A Survey Evaluation” is being presented Mon., Oct. 4, 10:15-10:20AM EDT, at the Metro Toronto Convention Centre.

  •      OBESITY DOES NOT LIMIT ACCESS TO BREAST RECONSTRUCTION OR PATIENT SATISFACTION, STUDY FINDS

(Embargo for Release: Monday, October 4, 2010)

Although research has shown 70 percent of breast cancer patients are not informed about breast reconstruction, a new study found obesity is not among the biases that cause referring physicians not to refer women for the procedure. According to the study, presented at the American Society of Plastic Surgeons (ASPS) Plastic Surgery 2010 conference, Oct. 1-5, in Toronto, obese breast cancer patients, although more difficult to treat, are being referred for breast reconstruction at the same rate as normal or overweight patients. The authors examined 384 women after mastectomy and compared breast reconstruction referral patterns, satisfaction, motivating factors and type of reconstruction across weight categories. One-third of the women were normal weight, one-third overweight, and one-third obese. The study found, about half of the women in each weight category received reconstruction and obesity did not limit access to either immediate (at same time as mastectomy) or delayed breast reconstruction. Obese patients were also as, or more, concerned about body image and sexuality, post breast reconstruction, as normal and overweight patients. Although satisfaction levels were similar amongst all the women, obese patients were more likely to feel sexually attractive following reconstruction and were significantly more satisfied with how their clothes fit. Motivating factors for reconstruction were similar, with the majority of women in each weight wanting to feel whole again, to avoid a prosthesis, to feel less conscious during sex, and to overcome the constant reminder of cancer, respectively. Obese women were more likely to choose reconstruction using their own tissue, rather than breast implants.

By the Numbers:
-More than 86,000 breast reconstructions were performed in 2009, up 9 percent since 2008 and up 10 percent since 2000, the ASPS reports.
-1 in 8 women in the U.S. will be diagnosed with breast cancer, according to Susan G. Komen.

Study: “Patterns of Use and Surgical Outcomes of Breast Reconstruction among Obese Patients: Results from a Population-Based Study” is being presented Mon., Oct. 4, 10:20-10:25AM EDT, at the Metro Toronto Convention Centre.

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LaSandra Cooper
American Society of Plastic Surgeons
(847) 981-5414
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