Drivers are Speeding Involuntarily, Says IAM Poll

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An IAM (Institute of Advanced Motorists) poll has found that the majority of drivers want to comply with the speed limit, but find it difficult.

The poll confirms the view of road safety professionals: it’s vital that imminent public spending cuts don’t compromise high profile road policing.

An IAM (Institute of Advanced Motorists) poll has found that the majority of drivers want to comply with the speed limit, but find it difficult.

Nearly 90 per cent of the 3,000 respondents to the online poll said they aim to comply with the speed limit but 60 per cent admitted that they found it difficult to keep within the limit.

Neil Greig, IAM Director of Policy and Research said: “It’s good to know most people want to stay within the law when it comes to speeding, but too many seem to find it challenging. The results suggest that people are aware of the limit and don’t want to break it, but temptation and pressure from other traffic may push them to go faster.”

The most popular factor leading respondents to speed was disagreement with imposed limits on certain roads (57 per cent of respondents who admit to speeding), while police presence was the most effective deterrent, with 40 per cent of speeders claiming to be put off. Only ten per cent cited safety cameras as the biggest deterrent.

“There is a discrepancy between drivers’ perception of the correct speed and the posted limits imposed by authorities. Further training helps improve driver perception and teaches motorists about appropriate speeds, but the government should also ensure the current review of speed limits results in roads visually fitting their limit - if we can get the limits right it is clear that many more drivers will stick to them,” added Mr Greig.

“The poll confirms the view of road safety professionals: it’s vital that imminent public spending cuts don’t compromise high profile road policing.”

The poll also found that seven per cent of respondents “don’t even think about” whether they are breaking the limit, while conscience deters 17 per cent from speeding.

Notes to editors:

  •     The 3,052 respondents to the poll (18 August – 18 September) were made up of IAM members, non-members and associate members
  •      When asked on what type of road they be most likely to speed, 58 per cent of respondents said they would be most likely speed on motorways, 20 per cent on rural roads, 4 per cent in towns, and 18 per cent would not speed regardless of the road.

Media contacts:
IAM Press Office – 020 8996 9777
ISDN broadcast lines available
iam.org.uk

Ends All

1. The IAM (Institute of Advanced Motorists) directly influences the driving and riding of more than 100,000 full members in the UK and Ireland. Established in 1956, the IAM is today best known for the advanced driving test and the advanced driving course, which is available to car, motorcycle and commercial licence holders. The IAM has grown to become the UK’s largest independent road safety charity, dedicated to raising driving standards, engaging with the road-using public and influencing road safety policy. The commercial division of the IAM operates through occupational driver training companies IAM Fleet and Drive & Survive.
2. A 2006 report by Brunel University, following an 18 month study, concluded that “advanced driver training produces safer drivers and lower accident involvement”, with measurable improvements in knowledge, skills and attitude.
3. In January 2007, the IAM established the Policy and Research Division to undertake research, promote practical policies, act as an advocate for safer roads, safer drivers and safer vehicles and encourage responsible motoring through education and training.
4. IAM Skill for Life programmes are delivered through a UK wide network of over 200 voluntary IAM groups, details of which can be found at iam.org.uk.

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Daisy Cross
Institute of Advanced Motorists
0208 996 9777
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