Young Americans Eager to Install Insulation, Energy Efficiency Measures, Survey Says

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The next generation of homeowners and homebuyers understands the economic, energy, and environmental benefits of insulation - and is eager to install energy efficiency measures in the home.

Young Americans are strongly attuned to saving energy costs and protecting the environment through the installation of insulation and other energy efficiency measures, says a new survey commissioned by a leading insulation producers association.

When informed that the Environmental Protection Agency believes that proper insulation could save homeowners 20 percent to 40 percent on monthly energy bills, more than 80 percent of consumers under the age of 34 said they would be very likely to install or upgrade existing insulation in their homes. That compares to just over 70 percent of overall consumers.

The survey, conducted by the Council of the North American Insulation Manufacturers Association (http://www.naima.org/council/), polled 800 registered voters to gauge knowledge and use of insulation and other home energy-efficiency measures, as well as determine public receptivity to messages about energy efficiency. The study found that messages about the benefits of insulation resonated with voters under 34 more strongly than with any other sub-group.

“Our survey results bode well for the future of the insulation industry,” said Kate Offeringa, CEO of the Council of NAIMA. “This data clearly shows that the next generation of homeowners and homebuyers understands the economic, energy, and environmental benefits of insulation – and is eager to install energy efficiency measures in the home.”

“Policymakers need to keep this information in mind when considering home energy efficiency programs such as Home Star,” Offringa continued. “These programs don’t just apply to current homeowners, but help shape standards that will guide future policy supporting energy efficiency - a policy strongly supported by the newest generation of consumers.”

“When people think about making their homes more energy-efficient, new insulation is clearly the improvement of choice,” said Offringa. Once informed of the benefits of insulation, however, 18-34 year olds are 25 percent more likely than the average consumer to want to act on that information. “That translates directly to improved energy efficiency and jobs for insulation manufacturers and installers, especially with added help from programs like Home Star,” Offringa added.

About the Council of NAIMA (http://www.naima.org/council/)
The Council of the North America Insulation Manufacturers Association advocates for policies and programs that encourage and incentivize increased energy efficiency through insulation in new and existing residential and commercial buildings and industrial applications. Membership in the Council of NAIMA is open to thermal and acoustical insulation manufacturers – regardless of insulation product type – and their suppliers located in North America.

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Tim Gay

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