As Giants Compete for the NLCS on the San Francisco Bay Shoreline, the Community Rallies to Halt Massive Bay Development

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Giants fans who are gathering in and around AT&T Park, with its spectacular vistas, celebrate San Francisco Bay, and are reminded that our quality of life and economy depend on a healthy and vibrant Bay. But deep-pocketed businesses from Minnesota and Arizona are intent on destroying the Bay we all love. Despite growing opposition, Cargill and DMB Associates are planning to place a new city of 12,000 homes on restorable Bay wetlands.

A banner calling on Cargill and DMB Associates to halt their plans for a massive development in San Francisco Bay flies over AT&T Park prior to the Phillies v. Giants NLCS game on Tuesday.

"Cargill and DMB are two giant corporations that don’t care about our environment, and they don’t share our Bay Area value that we don’t build in San Francisco Bay," says David Lewis, Save The Bay Executive Director.

Today we celebrate our San Francisco Giants competing for the National League Series Championship on the shoreline of our beautiful great natural treasure, San Francisco Bay. Giants fans who are gathering in and around AT&T Park, with its spectacular vistas, celebrate San Francisco Bay, and are reminded that our quality of life and economy depend on a healthy and vibrant Bay.

But deep-pocketed businesses from Minnesota and Arizona are intent on destroying the Bay we all love. Cargill and DMB Associates want to fill in 1,400 acres of bay salt ponds with a massive new development of 12,000 homes, even though urban sprawl has already reduced the Bay's size by one-third and destroyed more than 90 percent of the Bay's wetlands. These salt ponds can and must be restored to natural tidal marsh to benefit people and wildlife, according to scientists. In fact, this evening, Cargill and DMB Associates’ massive development plan will move ahead in a meeting before the Redwood City Planning Commission.

“Cargill and DMB are two giant corporations that don’t care about our environment, and they don’t share our Bay Area value that we don’t build in the Bay," says David Lewis, Save The Bay Executive Director. “In light of the growing opposition to this development by more than 150 elected officials, Bay Area cities, environmental groups, industry, labor unions and residents, Cargill should sell the salt ponds for fair market value, based on a new and accurate appraisal, or donate them to a public agency for restoration to wetlands.”

Representing 25,000 members and supporters, Save The Bay is joined by the Center for Biological Diversity, Audubon, Friends of Redwood City and Sierra Club in fighting Cargill’s development. Concerned that placing homes near the only deepwater port in the South Bay will threaten the Bay Area economy and hundreds of jobs, the Pacific Merchant Shipping Association also opposes the project. Further. in an unprecedented showing of regional unity, more than 150 mayors, city, county, and state elected officials from throughout the Bay Area are speaking out in opposition along with neighboring cities Menlo Park, Belmont and Atherton. State leaders who actively oppose the project include Senators Loni Hancock, Ellen Corbett and Mark Leno and Assemblymembers Jared Huffman, Jim Beall and Tom Ammiano.

Save The Bay is calling on Bay Area residents to stop these outside interests from destroying what we’ve worked for 50 years to protect and restore. Concerned citizens can learn more and take action at http://www.DontPaveMyBay.org.

About Save The Bay
Save The Bay is the largest regional organization working to protect, restore and celebrate San Francisco Bay. As its leading champion since 1961, Save The Bay protects the Bay from pollution and inappropriate shoreline development, making it cleaner and healthier for people and wildlife. We restore habitat and secure strong policies to re-establish 100,000 acres of wetlands that are essential for a healthy Bay. We engage more than 25,000 supporters, advocates and volunteers to protect the Bay, and inspire the next generation of environmental leaders by educating thousands of students annually. http://www.saveSFbay.org

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Jessica Castelli
Save The Bay
510-452-9261 ext. 104
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