Truck Driving School Reports Positive Feedback From New CSA 2010 Rules

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Truck Driver Training School announces a positive feedback from the new CSA 2010 rules. The new rules assign points for safety violations during inspections and crashes.

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National Truck School

"The data shows that the truck driving industry is still a very secure and rewarding career for many years to come"

The Federal Motor Carrier Safety Administration recently released a new update on their guidelines known as CSA 2010. Under the new Federal Motor Carrier Safety Administration rules, drivers and Trucking Companies are assigned points for safety violations during inspections and crashes.

The new CSA is designed to prevent commercial vehicle crashes by implementing a new motor carrier rating system mainly based on the characteristics and behavioral factors of drivers. These new guidelines are aimed at addressing the negative driver behaviors and to intervene with carriers that utilize drivers that are unfit and unsafe to be on the roads.

"The new CSA 2010 rules make truck driving as a whole a more professional career. At National Training, we have always promoted safety and professionalism to our students. The new CSA 2010 rules will make sure that everyone abides by these same standards. Thus, making our roads safer for everyone,” says a National Truck Training representative.

The main thing that the new CSA guidelines deal with are: Driver Fitness, Unsafe Driving, Fatigued Driving, Controlled Substances/Alcohol, Crash Indicator, Vehicle Maintenance, and Improper Loading/Cargo as a few examples. These safety measures and CSA requirements should be discussed properly in a proper CDL Training to ensure that all future truck drivers are already equipped and knowledgeable about all these latest guidelines in order to avoid incurring fines, penalties, and other problems later on. Truck operators should make sure to review and screen their drivers carefully since this will also affect their ratings. The more reliable and well rated their drivers are, the lesser they will pay insurance premiums and they can also be entitled to higher shipping or handling rates.

Based on BLS Occupational Outlook Handbook 2010-11, job opportunities between 2008-2018 for Truck Drivers and driver/sales workers are anticipated to increase by 9 percent; heavy and tractor-trailer truck drivers are anticipated to increase by 13 percent; and light or delivery services truck drivers by 4 percent increase.

As of October 2010, the average salary for truck drivers is $34,605 - $52,970 based on payscale.com. Truck drivers can also benefit from working at high paying cities; for example, the #1 highest paying city which is Anchorage, Alaska where truck drivers earn an hourly rate range of $18.32 - $23.53; next is Seattle, Washington with truck driver’s hourly rate range of $17.22 - $24.48; and Sacramento, California with truck driver’s hourly rate range of $16.97 - $22.58.

The above data shows that the truck driving industry is still a very secure and rewarding career for many years to come.

About National Truck Drivers School:
National Truck Drivers School is a nationally accredited career school in Florida that has trained over 30,000 men and women since 1978. A series of unique courses and programs teach qualified applicants to drive big rigs in a matter of weeks, enabling them to pass their CDL Training and get their CDL licensing from a DETC accredited, DANTES program, and VA Approved Truck Driving School to become safe, well paid operators of semi tractor trailers. Contact: Contact Information: David Rose National Training http://www.truckschool.com 1-800-488-7364

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