GOED Publishes Review on DHA Alzheimer's Study

Share Article

In response to a recent study published in JAMA on DHA and Alzheimer's disease, GOED -- the Global Organization for EPA and DHA Omega-3 -- has published a rapid review alert analyzing the study and its implications.

The Global Organization for EPA and DHA Omega-3

This study leaves open the possibility that DHA supplementation prior to the onset of Alzheimer's disease could provide a neuroprotective benefit, such as delayed onset of symptoms and delayed progression of disease.

In the Nov. 3, 2010 issue of the Journal of the American Medical Association (JAMA), researchers reported that the rate of cognitive and functional decline in patients with mild to moderate Alzheimer's disease, a progressive neurological disorder, was not slowed by supplementing with docosahexaenoic acid (DHA), the most abundant long-chain omega-3 fatty acid in the brain.

GOED has published a Rapid Review analyzing the JAMA study in its Advances in EPA and DHA Research journal. To view GOED's complete review of today's JAMA article, click here.

"While this trial examined DHA's impact on patients who already had Alzheimer’s disease, it's important to keep in mind that most experts emphasize omega-3's benefits likely lie in the prevention or delayed onset of many health conditions, including dementia and Alzheimer's. Two prior studies, MIDAS and OmegAD, were randomized, double-blind placebo-controlled trials that showed a benefit to individuals with age-related cognitive decline or very mild Alzheimer's disease, respectively,” said Harry Rice, Ph.D., vice president of regulatory and scientific affairs for the Global Organization for EPA and DHA (GOED).

"This study leaves open the possibility that DHA supplementation prior to the onset of Alzheimer's disease could provide a neuroprotective benefit, such as delayed onset of symptoms and delayed progression of disease,” said Rice.

Additionally, the current study did not address other questions about the role omega-3s may play in reducing the risk of Alzheimer's. For instance, the trial did not examine supplementation with eicosapentaenoic acid (EPA), another important omega-3 fatty acid, although research published in the American Journal of Clinical Nutrition in 2008 suggested that a high plasma EPA concentration may decrease the risk of dementia (Samieri et al., 2008).

Rice noted that the impact of EPA and DHA on dementia, cardiovascular health and other issues will be examined at the organization's annual conference, the GOED Exchange, in January 2011. More information on the conference and registration details can be found at http://www.goedexchange.com.

About GOED:
GOED is a proactive and accountable association of the world's finest processors, refiners, manufacturers, distributors, marketers, retailers and supporters of products containing Eicosapentaenoic Acid (EPA) and Docosahexaenoic Acid (DHA) omega-3 fatty acids. The organization's objectives are to promote and protect the category, educate consumers about the health benefits of EPA/DHA, and work with government groups, the healthcare community and the industry, while setting high standards for its business sector. GOED and its members are committed to personal integrity, ethical corporate behavior, public safety and quality assurance. For more information, visit http://www.goedquality.com or follow them on Twitter @GOEDOmega3.

###

Share article on social media or email:

View article via:

Pdf Print

Contact Author

Miranda Barnard

801-538-0777
Email >
Visit website