Nine Out of 10 Fans Want Video Technology in Football

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Football’s governing bodies are acting against the wishes of fans by not introducing video technology into the game, a new survey from Staffordshire University has revealed. The latest online survey, which has prompted over 1000 responses in the first week, found that nine out of 10 fans feel technology would help referees to make key decisions about goals, red cards, penalties, offside decisions, diving and foul tackles.

This is the first time the people who pay for the season tickets, football merchandise and subscription television fees have been asked what they think about one of the game's burning issues.

Football’s governing bodies are acting against the wishes of fans by not introducing video technology into the game, a new survey from Staffordshire University has revealed.

The latest online survey, which has prompted over 1000 responses in the first week, found that nine out of 10 fans feel technology would help referees to make key decisions about goals, red cards, penalties, offside decisions, diving and foul tackles.

The survey is the second carried out by researchers Professor Ellis Cashmore and Dr Jamie Cleland who are hopeful that the http://www.topfan.co.uk website will become synonymous with the opinions of football fans worldwide.

Dr Cleland said: “This is the first time the people who pay for the season tickets, football merchandise and subscription television fees have been asked what they think about one of the game’s burning issues.”

Professor Cashmore added: “The game’s rulers are embarrassingly out of touch with the people who pay their wages: we now have hard evidence that Fifa and Uefa are acting against the express wishes of fans.”

The ten percent of fans who agree with football authorities’ resistance to video technology argue that it would break up the continuity of the game. But seven out of 10 fans insist that fair play is being distorted by its absence.

Eight out of 10 also disagreed with a recent statement from Uefa president Michel Platini that the sport would be reduced to the status of a PlayStation game if video technology was introduced.

Sports such as cricket, rugby, tennis and American football already employ video technology, but football fans believe the reluctance to embrace change is due to a lack of understanding about how technology can benefit sport.

The new online survey follows the success of an earlier Staffordshire University survey, which revealed that the vast majority of fans believe gay footballers should be supported to be open about their sexuality.

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Professor Ellis Cashmore

Dr Jamie Cleland
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