New Wants and Needs Game Aims to Help Parents with the "Give-mes"

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New card game teaches players how to quickly grasp the difference between "wants" from "needs." It's a great learning tool for parents and teachers focused on financial education.

Wants & Needs Cards

“It’s a mind-opening experience when players are challenged to prioritize their wants and needs. But equally enlightening are the reactions as players defend their choices, often with silly logic,” says J.M. Seymour, financial educator and author.

PRWEB) November 22, 2010 -- “Mom, can I have that?” Most parents experience the issues of young children begging for a tempting goody at a store’s checkout. But what happens when they become teens and it's new cell phones, laptops, designer sunglasses or $150 shoes they're asking for?

A new game helps families quickly grasp the difference between wants and needs in a fun, engaging way. It’s appropriately called The Wants and Needs Game. The easy-to-play, fast-paced game pits players against each other to find the most pressing need or frivolous want each round. Raucous debates ensue as players explain their logic and try to persuade the judge to pick their cards.

“It’s a mind-opening experience when players are challenged to prioritize their wants and needs. But equally enlightening are the reactions as players defend their choices, often with silly logic,” says J.M. Seymour, financial educator, author and blogger. “Both teachers and parents find the game a fun and easy way to get kids to understand the difference between the need for shoes and the desire for expensive designer shoes, for example. The game has dozens of everyday items that can be either a want or a need, depending upon who you are. Which do you need: underwear, bottled water, or a mattress?”

Seymour said the versatile Wants & Needs card deck includes three game variations that can be played for 5 minutes or 55 minutes, making it an ideal classroom teaching tool as well as inexpensive, low-pressure family fun for elementary ages, teens, and even college kids. “The older the players, the more sophisticated the debates,” Seymour added.

Contestants are dealt a variety of random cards that feature everyday items--a textbook, computer, car, sunglasses, candy bar, t-shirt, allowance, cell phone, and more. After a designated judge shouts “want” or “need”, players quickly play the best card in their hand. The judge decides the winner for the round, based on lobbying by the player with the strongest case. Players can decide how many rounds the game will be played, and everyone gets a chance to be the judge.

Game #2 introduces identity cards. With this variation, each player is dealt an identity, such as working retiree, 16 year old, college graduate, or single mom, and plays cards according to the assigned identity.
Players’ perspective changes, said Seymour. “Lights go on when a teenager is thrust into the decision-making role of a young mother, for example. The understanding that occurs as players lobby for their choices is enlightening and fun. And, it’s a great way for kids to understand why parents must make some choices about money,” says Seymour.

The Wants & Needs Game can be played with three or more, ages 8 to adult, and can be purchased for $11.95 at http://www.moneygodmotherblog.com, http://www.dynamindspublishing.com.

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Charles Kuster

J.M. Seymour
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