The Money Smart Rule: If It’s Too Good to Be True, Don’t Invest

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With interest rates at almost zero and a stock market that’s gone nowhere for the last 10 years, people are under tremendous pressure to make more money on their investments. There are many options for consumers to consider when making financial decisions, but not all of them are in their best interest. So what can potential investors do to avoid getting taken? Ted Hunter, author of the new personal finance book Money Smart, offers an amazingly simple common-sense rule: If it seems too good to be true, then it’s too good to be true—so don’t invest.

Ted Hunter believes that with basic knowledge of personal finance consumers can make educated choices, avoid investment traps, and create their own financial freedom. His book, Money Smart: How to Spend, Save, Eliminate Debt, and Achieve Financial Freedom is a guide to making sensible and informed personal finance choices.

“The world is full of people who want to ‘help’ you get rich,” says Hunter. “Translation: They want to get their hands on your money.” Consumers can protect themselves by looking out for certain words and phrases that can be warnings, Hunter suggests.

With interest rates at almost zero and a stock market that’s gone nowhere for the last 10 years, people are under tremendous pressure to make more money on their investments. There are many options for consumers to consider when making financial decisions, but not all of them are in their best interest. So what can potential investors do to avoid getting taken? Ted Hunter, author of the new personal finance book Money Smart, offers an amazingly simple common-sense rule: If it seems too good to be true, then it’s too good to be true—so don’t invest.

“The world is full of people who want to ‘help’ you get rich,” says Hunter. “Translation: They want to get their hands on your money.” Consumers can protect themselves by looking out for certain words and phrases that can be warnings, Hunter suggests. Some of the most common “magic words” used to describe an investment opportunity are: free, secret, sure-fire, anyone can do it, always, no-risk, foolproof, insider, confidential, the smart money, nothing down, easy money, magic, not a get-rich-quick scheme, become a millionaire, just a few hours of your spare time, almost nothing to do, and makes-you-money-while-you-sleep. Every one of these words or phrases should be taken as a red flag warning the consumer to walk away and refuse the offer—whatever it may be.

“You don’t get high rewards at low risks, or for little effort – and there are no secrets,” states Hunter. “In the stock market, by the time a stockbroker calls to tell you the ‘smart money’ is on buying a particular fund or stock, you’re either too late or they’re just saying what it takes to sell it to you.”

Hunter believes that with basic knowledge of personal finance consumers can make educated choices, avoid investment traps, and create their own financial freedom. His book, Money Smart: How to Spend, Save, Eliminate Debt, and Achieve Financial Freedom is a guide to making sensible and informed personal finance choices.

Combining Hunter’s sixty years of experience and a common-sense approach, Money Smart shows readers that they are capable of managing their money better than anyone else. Presenting easy-to-use tools and a clear list of rules to follow, Money Smart teaches readers to make solid, educated decisions so they can effectively manage their money and make their dreams a reality. Money Smart can be purchased online at http://www.MoneySmartOnline.com and Amazon.com.

About the Author
Ted Hunter is a successful business man who, thirty years ago, built a successful real estate brokerage with over 100 agents, which went bust in the real estate crash of the late ’80s. Learning from this experience he then entered into the stockbrokerage industry, successfully helping his clients make money and advising his clients to get out of the stock market in early 2000 before the market started to dive. In the fall of 2005 he did it again, warning all who would listen of the coming crash of the real estate market. He wrote Money Smart to share his knowledge of cycles in both the real estate and financial markets and help people take control of their money and create financial freedom.

Ted is a native of the New York City area and now resides in Davis, California, with his wife Suchit, and their daughter Kat. Ted is also the proud father of three adult sons: John, Dave, and Dan.

MEDIA CONTACT:
Email: gabrielle(at)georgeacommunications(dot)com
Phone: 916-213-6350
Web: http://www.MoneySmartOnline.com

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