Blue Ridge Mountain Host Presents New Visitor Guide for 2010

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The 2010 Blue Ridge Mountains of North Carolina Visitor Guide, celebrates the historical and cultural highlights along the Blue Ridge Parkway during its 75th anniversary year, including the mountain metropolis of Asheville.

Blue Ridge Mountain Host presents new 2010 Blue Ridge Mountains of North Carolina Visitor Guide.

The Blue Ridge Mountain Host is a 10-county tourism coalition based in Asheville, NC. This year, it celebrates the historical and cultural highlights along the Blue Ridge Parkway during the Parkway's 75th anniversary year, including the mountain metropolis of Asheville NC, with the release of its 2010 visitor guide. The guide is available just in time for those who are planning their Asheville vacations.

The 2010 Blue Ridge Mountains of North Carolina Visitor Guide provides would-be visitors with an introduction to Western North Carolina, and the Blue Ridge Parkway, which turns 75 this year. Asheville community leaders in the early 1900s campaigned to bring the picturesque Blue Ridge Parkway through the Blue Ridge Mountains to their doorstep. Today the area offers several stops that are right on the Parkway. These include the Folk Art Center (Milepost 382), the North Carolina Arboretum (Milepost 393) and the newly constructed Blue Ridge Parkway Visitor Center (Near Milepost 384)—a “must see” in this anniversary year.

The Asheville Visitor Center, just off I-240 at Exit 4C on Montford Avenue, is where local experts can help visitors plan their tours around specific interests. Tickets to area attractions and downtown tours can be purchased on site.

Visitors wandering through historic downtown Asheville will discover interesting restaurants, smiling street entertainers and fascinating shops stocked with fine art, local crafts, antiques and imported items. The ornate Grove Arcade was a focal point of 1929 Asheville that has been restored to its original glory, now housing locally owned shops and restaurants. Asheville’s history can also be explored by taking a tour of Biltmore®, America’s largest home; seeing the boyhood home of author Thomas Wolfe; or visiting the beautifully restored Smith McDowell House.

There are more than 250 independent restaurants in Asheville, most working hand-in-hand with local growers and artisan food makers to create innovative culinary experiences. Many eateries have sidewalk tables and live music. Asheville is a town filled with music, including "Shindig on the Green" the singing/dancing event that takes place on the town square on Saturday nights in the summer. Asheville offers endless evening entertainment in the forms of great dining, theater, brewpubs and music from blues to bluegrass to symphonic.

Individual copies of the 2010 Blue Ridge Mountain Host Visitor Guide are available for visitors by calling 1-800-807-3391. For print and online advertising opportunities or to requests cases of the guide (100 per case) contact Blue Ridge Mountain Host at 828-285-9907. The Blue Ridge Mountain Host Visitor Guide may also be requested or downloaded from the organization’s web site: http://www.ncblueridge.com

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Elly Wells
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