Travel Theory: Conversations with the Imaginary and the Real

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Oil paintings by award winning artist, architect, and educator Gail Boyajian fascinate and dazzle viewers with a blend of classical technique and symbolic themes at the Spencer Presentation Gallery at the Endicott College Center for the Arts now through March 23, 2011. The exhibit and reception are free and open to the public.

Oil paintings by award winning artist, architect, and educator Gail Boyajian fascinate and dazzle viewers with a blend of classical technique and symbolic themes. Ms. Boyajian’s diverse background can be seen in her allegorical landscape paintings that reference art history, natural history, and contemporary culture often from a bird’s eye view. These works are currently on display in the Spencer Presentation Gallery at the Endicott College Center for the Arts, 376 Hale Street, Beverly, now through March 23, 2011, Monday from 1:30-7:00 pm; Tuesday and Thursday from 12:00 -7:00 pm; Friday from 9:00 am – 5:00 pm; and Saturday and Sunday from 2:00-4:00 pm. A gallery reception is scheduled on Wednesday, February 16, from 5:00 – 7:00 p.m. The exhibit and reception are free and open to the public.

Varying in size, these oil paintings, that were created over the past eight years, address themes of travel: migration, emigration, vacation and exploration. According to Ms. Boyajian, “The landscapes that I paint are imaginary but based on real places. Painting for me is a way to investigate and understand the beauty of nature around me, and to imagine a fused past, present and future. Political and environmental concerns are often a touchstone in my exploration of the relationship between the global and the intimate.”

Ms. Boyajian’s works are rich in color and content, inviting the viewer to observe the often-hidden elements and meanings within each panel. The artist plays with scale and creatively juxtaposes humans, creatures and birds within her paintings. Ms. Boyajian also states, “The way that human settlements interact with the natural environment that I studied as an architect has been a starting point for my paintings, but as an artist I am liberated from a purely documentary role and allowed to include those things not obviously visible. I have come to see landscapes and cities as characters, created by the voices and ghosts of present and past inhabitants, artistic efforts, religious beliefs, geologic formations and life forms other than human, in dialogue with each other.

Artists, historians, curators, collectors and students alike appreciate the beauty, depth of thought, and skillful execution of Ms. Boyajian’s works of art. For these reasons Dean of the School of Visual and Performing Arts, Mark Towner, considered this artist and exhibition to be a perfect learning opportunity for the fine-art students at Endicott College. Travel Theory: Conversations with the Imaginary and the Real and Endicott College’s related programming are central to the mission of the School of Visual and Performing Arts, where approximately 250 students are earning Bachelor degrees in Creative Arts Therapy, Graphic Design, Photography, Studio Art, and Interior Design, with an option for a concentration in Sustainable Design. The School also offers minors in Art History, Creative Arts Therapy, Graphic Design, Music, Photography, Studio Art, and Theater. For further information on this exhibit or any of the events at the Center for the Arts, please contact Kathleen Moore at 978-232-2655 or kmoore(at)endicott(dot)edu or visit http://www.endicott.edu/centerforthearts.

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Kathleen Moore
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