New Continuing Education Course Targets Parkinson’s Disease Healthcare Professionals

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Evidence-based instructional seminar geared to PT/OT/RN/athletic trainers provides methods and fitness techniques for implementing community-based, Parkinson’s-specific exercise classes using Delay the Disease Parkinson’s Fitness Program

David Zid and Jackie Russell

Our goal is to make the benefits of DTD classes available to as many people with PD as possible. The best way to do this is through sharing our experiences and knowledge with fellow healthcare professionals who treat people with PD.

“Delay the Disease” is a fitness program designed to empower people with Parkinson’s Disease (PD) by optimizing their physical function and helping to delay the progression of symptoms. The program,which is available as a book and DVD, is also the foundation for exercise classes geared specifically to counteract the movement challenges experienced by people with Parkinson’s (PWP).

David Zid and Jackie Russell, partners in “Delay the Disease,” (DTD) are now instructing other healthcare professionals and athletic trainers how to become Parkinson's-specific with their treatment and exercise programs by providing methods for creating a successful PD exercise program in their area. Approved for 10 Continuing Education credits for PT’s, OT’s, RN’s and athletic trainers, the two-day seminar provides evidence-based updates relating to the symptoms, challenges and treatment of PD. Course instructors, who include Zid, Russell and a Parkinson’s-specific, PhD physical therapist/university-based clinical professor, provide participants with the knowledge needed to successfully create and implement an interdisciplinary exercise and wellness program for people with PD.

Attendees will learn about the most recent evidenced-based studies on the effects of exercise and physical therapy on the symptomatic management of PD. They will be taught the theories and methods behind the DTD fitness agenda so that they can create and lead community-based DTD exercise classes where they live. According to Zid and Russell, “Our goal is to make the benefits of DTD classes available to as many people with PD as possible. The best way to do this is through sharing our experiences and knowledge with fellow healthcare professionals who treat people with PD.”

The seminar has been given in Columbus, OH, Toledo, OH and Chicago, IL. It is also scheduled for Tyler, TX and Des Moines, IA. On the post-course evaluation, attendees have offered extreme praise for the content, presenters and instructors. For example: “...I appreciate the thorough, very informative, extremely practical information that I can use immediately.” And: “...I really appreciated all of the evidence-based research– nice to have resources cited, great presentation. Thank you for including the bibliography and articles section so I can further review the scientific evidence that supports the exercises.”

People interested in taking the DTD Parkinson’s Disease Seminar for Healthcare Professionals and Athletic Trainers should contact Jackie Russell by e-mail at delaythedisease@gmail.com. More information about DTD, Zid and Russell is available on the Web at delaythedisease.com.

Certified through ACE as a personal trainer and APG as a functional fitness trainer, David Zid has spent more than a decade training hundreds of clients, specifically the older adult, and teaching other personal trainers his unique exercise methods. For the past two years Zid has devoted half of his one-on-one weekly training sessions to people with Parkinson’s. As a result of his observations and experiences in this endeavor, he agrees wholeheartedly with the neurologists and Parkinson’s researchers who have begun to see exercise as “The new drug for Parkinson’s.”

In her 30 year career as a registered nurse, Jackie Russell is credentialed with professional achievement in perioperative nursing (CNOR) and ACLS certified. Instrumental in helping Zid translate his PD exercise program into a book and DVD, Russell is passionate about spreading the message of hope that daily exercise can empower people with Parkinson’s to face this disease with a proactive attitude. She is convinced that exercise can be their “trump card,” allowing them to believe “I may have Parkinson's but it does not have me.”

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