Celebrate Inconvenience Yourself™ Day on Wednesday February 23, 2011

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Inconvenience Yourself™ Day is celebrated on February 23, 2011. The day is an opportunity to focus on inconveniencing ourselves instead of inconveniencing others. Inconvenience Yourself™ is a way of living. It includes not only how people behave, but also recognizing and acknowledging the actions of others. This everyday concept has been recognized by Chase’s Calendar of Events and has received national attention.

Wednesday February 23, 2011 is Inconvenience Yourself™ Day. The concept is simple, the idea is embraceable, and it certainly seems like common sense. But in the shuffle of day-to-day activities, people get lost in their busy lives and forget how their actions affect others.

"Think about the last time you cut someone off in traffic or hurried out the door without holding it for the person behind you…it probably wasn’t intentional nor did you even notice there was anyone so close behind," says Julie Thompson, creator of Inconvenience Yourself™.

The idea behind Inconvenience Yourself™ encourages people to pay attention to their own actions, understand how their actions affect others, and adjust which actions have a negative impact on people they encounter.

Inconvenience Yourself™ is a way of living. It includes not only how people behave, but also recognizing and acknowledging the actions of others. This everyday concept has been recognized by Chase’s Calendar of Events and has received national attention. Celebrated on the fourth Wednesday in February, the day is an opportunity for people to focus on inconveniencing themselves instead of inconveniencing others. It is also a day to recognize and acknowledge those who inconvenience themselves for others. Acknowledgment can be verbal, a note, or some small token of appreciation. The concept has been embraced by businesses, teachers, children and parents.

A child can inconvenience themselves by being responsible, dependable and polite. A teacher can incorporate the concept through education and by reinforcing values. Students can learn classroom citizenship to help prevent bullying. A business can integrate the idea into their customer relations and customer service standards.

Thompson explains, “Many of our actions seem to say we think we are more significant than the next person; that our lives and schedules are more important than some else’s. We often inconvenience other people to make our own lives easier and don’t give a thought to the impact of our actions on others. This movement is a way to recognize how we can positively change the way we go about our lives.”

Stories from children, teachers and business owners who have inconvenienced themselves for others can be found on the Inconvenience Yourself™ website. Thompson also encourages people to share their stories to help spread the idea. For more information about how Inconvenience Yourself™ can change lives, business or classroom activities, visit http://www.inconvenienceyourself.com or email Julie Thompson at julie(at)inconvenienceyourself(dot)com.

About Inconvenience Yourself™: Inconvenience Yourself™ was conceived in 2006 after Julie Thompson observed that many people forget to think about how their actions affect other people. In the fast-paced world in which we live, with schedules overflowing with commitments, people go about their lives without recognizing that what they do impacts other people. Inconvenience Yourself™ is not intended to suggest that people become completely self-sacrificing. Instead, it encourages people to pay attention to their own actions, understand how those actions impact others, and adjust actions which have a negative effect on others. For more information, contact Julie Thompson at (954) 693-4604 or email julie(at)inconvenienceyourself(dot)com.

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