Dividing the Care for Elderly Parents Helps Phoenix Famlies Avoid Conflict

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The 50-50 Rule refers to the average age (50) when siblings are caring for their parents as well as the need for brothers and sisters to share in the plans for care 50-50. Research conducted for the Home Instead Senior Care® network reveals that an inability to work together often leads to one sibling becoming responsible for the bulk of caregiving in 43 percent of families.

“Any Phoenix family that has cared for a senior loved one knows that problems working with siblings can lead to family strife,” said Seplow, “Making decisions together, dividing the workload and teamwork are the keys to overcoming family conflict.

A Phoenix company is offering a new program – the 50-50 Rule – to help siblings overcome the family conflict that can become part of caring for elderly parents.

“Any Phoenix family that has cared for a senior loved one knows that problems working with siblings can lead to family strife,” said Debbie Seplow, owner of the local Home Instead Senior Care® office in Phoenix. “Making decisions together, dividing the workload and teamwork are the keys to overcoming family conflict.”

The 50-50 Rule refers to the average age (50) when siblings are caring for their parents as well as the need for brothers and sisters to share in the plans for care 50-50. Research conducted for the Home Instead Senior Care® network reveals that an inability to work together often leads to one sibling becoming responsible for the bulk of caregiving in 43 percent of families. And that can result in the deterioration of relationships with brothers and sisters.

“If you’re 50, have siblings and are assisting with the care of seniors, it’s time to develop a plan,” Seplow said. “This program can help.”

At the core of the 50-50 Rule public education program is a family relationship and communication guide of real-life situations that features practical advice from sibling relationships expert Dr. Ingrid Connidis from the University of Western Ontario.

“Like all relationships, siblings have a history,” Connidis noted. “Whatever happened in the past influences what happens in the present. Regardless of their circumstances, most siblings do feel a responsibility to care for parents that is built from love. And that’s a good place to start – optimistically and assuming the best.”

For more information about this free guide and other resources call 602-588-7725 or visit http://www.solvingfamilyconflict.com.

ABOUT HOME INSTEAD SENIOR CARE
Founded in 1994 in Omaha, the Home Instead Senior Care® network is the world's largest provider of non-medical in-home care services for seniors, with more than 900 independently owned and operated franchises in 14 countries spanning four continents. Home Instead Senior Care local offices employ 65,000+ CAREGiversSM who provide more than 40 million hours of client service each year through activities including companionship, meal preparation, medication reminders, light housekeeping, errands and shopping. Home Instead Senior Care founders Paul and Lori Hogan pioneered franchising in the non-medical senior care industry and are leading advocates for senior issues throughout the world. At Home Instead Senior Care, it’s relationship before task, while continuing to provide superior quality service that enhances the lives of seniors everywhere.

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Julie Swartz

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