International Seismic Application Technology Updates Earthquake Mitigation Services in the Wake of New Zealand Earthquakes

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ISAT announced updates to its earthquake mitigation services to educate building owners, as well as the building and construction community about seismic building code compliance. The update applies lessons learned from New Zealand’s recent earthquakes and advances best practices for seismic building code compliance.

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Ideally, building owners and construction professionals work together to ensure that not only are requirements met, but that necessary precautions are in place to adequately protect lives and mitigate the loss of construction investments and business.

International Seismic Application Technology (ISAT), the industry leader in seismic bracing and building code compliance for all non-structural building utilities, announced today they have updated their earthquake mitigation services for building owners of older structures as well as the building and construction community involved in retrofitting and code compliance initiatives. The lessons learned from the 6.3 aftershock in New Zealand brings the awareness that New Zealand’s building codes, considered among the most rigorous in the world, were no match for the magnitude of seismic jolts that shook the Christchurch area. ISAT is pushing for reevaluation of seismic building codes along with many other seismic hazard mitigation professionals, especially in regions that surround major fault zones. This update raises the bar in providing the best seismic building code education and compliance services internationally.

Meeting seismic requirements can be daunting, especially in today’s economy. While hospital, university and other essential facility administrators work toward meeting seismic code, some are forced to postpone these efforts, leaving building occupants at risk. "People who are living and working in these buildings are largely unaware that they're in buildings that are deemed by most professionals to be dangerous," said Thomas Heaton, Professor of Engineering Seismology at Caltech. "So it's almost certain that we're going to have some tragedy in the future, and various people will say, 'Oh yeah, we knew that that kind of building was a big problem.' And the rest of society will ask, 'Why didn't we do something about it?' “(LA Times 3-1-2011). Investigative teams dispatched to New Zealand after the quakes have reported a significant amount of non-structural building damage, even to newer buildings. It was also reported that a majority of September’s earthquake damage was non-structural, causing more than $15 billion dollars in damage for the two earthquakes combined. Experts have speculated New Zealand’s economy will struggle greatly as a result of all the damage, and are unsure of how long a recovery could take.

“Sadly, we learn the most about preventing earthquake damage from events like these. We should take the Christchurch earthquakes as a reminder that building code requirements define the minimum standards for building construction,” says ISAT Vice President Jim Massey. “Ideally, building owners and construction professionals work together to ensure that not only are requirements met, but that the necessary precautions are in place to adequately protect lives and mitigate the loss of construction investments and business continuity.”

About ISAT:
International Seismic Application Technology (ISAT) is the leading provider of seismic engineering & consulting services, quality assurance & restraint system components for nonstructural seismic bracing. With over 12,000 projects completed and over 1,000 OSHPD projects completed since 2003, ISAT has become an authoritative resource for construction professionals worldwide. For more information on ISAT, or to view other completed healthcare projects, visit our website at ISATsb.com, or call 877-523-6060.

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