AAPCHO’s New Diabetes Program to Address Diabetes in Vulnerable AA&NHOPI Communities Begins

Share Article

The Association of Asian Pacific Community Health Organizations’ diabetes program, which aims to reduce the secondary complications of diabetes among individuals living with the disease, is underway in three Asian American, Native Hawaiian, and other Pacific Islander communities.

The Association of Asian Pacific Community Health Organizations’ (AAPCHO) diabetes program to address diabetes among vulnerable populations is underway in three Asian American, Native Hawaiian, and other Pacific Islander (AA&NHOPI) communities.

The program, which aims to reduce the secondary complications of diabetes among individuals living with the disease, is being conducted in the Republic of the Marshall Islands by Ebeye Community Health Center, in Los Angeles by the Asian Pacific Health Care Venture, and in Waimanalo, Hawaii by the Waimanalo Health Center. Each program grantee is a community health center that provides health care services to medically underserved AA&NHOPI patients, many of whom are uninsured, low income, and limited English proficient.

The 5-year program includes not only greater diabetes education efforts among diabetes patients, but it will also involve program grantees working in close partnership with other local organizations to address diabetes within their larger community. Program grantees will be partnering with organizations such as: civic organizations, departments of public health, fitness centers, and local businesses.

"This program is unique for us in that its goal is to address diabetes more broadly, beyond just improving a diabetes patient's health through the clinic or medical provider's office," said Jeffrey Caballero, executive director of AAPCHO. "This program requires us to develop a broader collaborative strategy and network with more non-traditional partners, to address diabetes not just at the individual patient level, but at the local community level."

Currently 23.6 million people are living with diabetes in the U.S. Diabetes is a disease that continues to disproportionately impact AA&NHOPI communities. Community studies indicate that Native Hawaiians have prevalence rates of up to 4 times higher for age-adjusted type 2 diabetes. Japanese American men in Seattle have 2 to 3 times the prevalence rates of type 2 diabetes when compared to non-Hispanic whites.

About AAPCHO
AAPCHO is a national association of 28 community health organizations dedicated to promoting advocacy, collaboration, and leadership that improves the health status and access of Asian Americans, Native Americans, and other Pacific Islanders in the United States. For more information on AAPCHO and its Guiding Principles and Values, please visit http://www.aapcho.org. AAPCHO can also be found on Facebook at http://www.facebook.com/aapcho.

###

Share article on social media or email:

View article via:

Pdf Print