Gottlieb Photos “Jazz-up” Endicott’s Gallery

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During the 1930s and 40s William Gottlieb photographed the contemporary jazz scene to illustrate his columns in The Washington Post, Down Beat magazine, and other publications. Endicott College, Center for the Arts presents Portraits from the Golden Age of Jazz: Photos by William P. Gottlieb (1917 – 2006) in the Spencer Presentation Gallery, Center for the Arts, Endicott College, now through May 29, 2011.

Endicott College, Center for the Arts presents Portraits from the Golden Age of Jazz: Photos by William P. Gottlieb (1917 – 2006) in the Spencer Presentation Gallery, Center for the Arts, Endicott College, 376 Hale Street, Beverly, now through May 29, 2011. Gallery hours are: Monday, Tuesday, Thursday 1:30 – 7 p.m.; Friday: 9 – 5 p.m.; and Saturday and Sunday, 2-4 p.m. The exhibit is free and open to the public.

The reception for this exhibit will take place on Saturday, April 23, from 6:00 – 7:00 p.m. with cash bar. A concert in conjunction with the North Shore Jazz Project will feature Amanda Carr and the Evertt Longstreth Octet that will begin at 7:00 p.m. in the Rose Performance Hall. There is a general admission fee of $10 and $5 for Endicott College ID holders.

During the 1930s and 40s William Gottlieb photographed the contemporary jazz scene to illustrate his columns in The Washington Post, Down Beat magazine, and other publications. The photographic negatives were stored for more than thirty years until Gottlieb’s retirement in 1979, when he began printing the negatives. The rest is history - as Gottlieb is now one of the most honored jazz photographers in the world, with works in the permanent collections of numerous art galleries and museums.

Gottlieb’s images of these jazz artists from the “golden age of jazz” have become the standard icons of jazz history. According to jazz critic John Wilson of the New York Times, Gottlieb was able to combine his talents as a writer, photographer, and jazz enthusiast to capture images with a “distinctive, storytelling touch.” In addition, the Los Angeles Herald Examiner has said Gottlieb’s photographs, “…transcend mere documentation. They provide a dramatic, mood-inducing setting. All that is missing is the music.”

In April of 1995, the Library of Congress acquired the photographs of this eminent jazz photographer through the Ira and Leonore Gershwin Fund. The collection included Gottlieb’s photographs taken between 1938 and 1948, one of the richest periods in the history of jazz. Gottlieb retains the copyright of the photographs for an extended period; the Library of congress can use the images for research purposes.

William Paul Gottlieb died on April 23, 2006 at his home outside of New York City at the age of 89. He left behind his beloved wife of 67 years, Delia four children, six grandchildren and three great-grandchildren.

This collection of 65 black and white images is stunning as well as memorable to both jazz and photography lovers. The works were created mostly using the classic Speed Graphic camera, and unlike the photographers of today Photoshop was not used. Please join us as we celebrate William Gottlieb’s famous works and enjoy the programs planned for Saturday, April 23, 2011. Special Guest, Steve Schwartz, host of Jazz on WGBH, will emcee the concert and showcase his own jazz photography during the reception. To purchase tickets online, please go to http://www.endicott.edu/centerfortharts or call the box office at (978) 998-7700.

Portraits from the Golden Age of Jazz, and Endicott College’s related programming are central to the mission of the School of Visual + Performing Arts, where approximately 300 students are earning Bachelor degrees in Creative Arts Therapy, Graphic Design, Photography, Studio Art, and Interior Design, with an option for a concentration in Sustainable Design. The School also offers minors in Art History, Creative Arts Therapy, Graphic Design, Music, Photography, Studio Art, and Theater. For further information on this exhibit or any of the events at the Center for the Arts, please contact Kathleen Moore at 978-232-2655 or kmoore(at)endicott(dot)edu or visit http://www.endicott.edu/centerforthearts.

This exhibit was made possible with support from the van Otterloo Family Foundation. Exhibition tour management is by Smith Kramer Fine Art Services, Kansas City, Missouri.

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Kathleen Moore
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