Terrence Davies hosts ‘Distant Voices, Still Lives’ and ‘The Long Day Closes’ at Cineworld Haymarket -- April 26th

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Time Out Film Club’s exclusive double bill with one of Britain’s most celebrated cinema icons

Terrence Davies's 'Distant Voices, Still Lives'

The season offers people of London the chance to see some of the greatest British films ever made, presented by some of the film world’s most influential voices.

Director, writer and actor Terence Davies will introduce a rare double-bill of his two brilliant and poetic autobiographical films, 'Distant Voices, Still Lives' and 'The Long Day Closes'. The two films, set in working-class Liverpool of the 1940s and 1950s, established Davies as one of Britain's most inventive and original modern filmmakers of our time.

Held at Cineworld Haymarket in London on April 26th, Time Out Film Club’s exclusive screenings will give the public the rare chance to hear Terence Davies speak about his experience of making his first two features, his current movie ‘The Deep Blue Sea’ starring Rachel Weisz, and having a movie selected as one of the best British movies in Time Out’s 100 Best British Films.

Recently chosen by 150 film industry experts, Time Out’s 100 Best British Films is being celebrated through a season of 10 exclusive screenings. These rare cinema experiences are open to the public with tickets costing just £8, less than the price as a regular West End cinema ticket. Each screening features special introductions from leading members of the British cinema world, such as Jonathan Pryce, Sally Hawkins and David Morrissey.

Tim Arthur, Director of Time Out Live, comments: “The season offers people of London the chance to see some of the greatest British films ever made, presented by some of the film world’s most influential voices. A movie aficionado’s dream and the perfect opportunity to catch up on all those films you really should have experienced up there on the big screen where they belong.”

Last month, a panel of film experts including Sam Mendes (Director of American Beauty) and Wes Anderson (Director of Fantastic Mr Fox) selected ‘Distant Voices, Still Lives’ as number three in Time Out's 100 Best British Films.

Davies’ ‘Distant Voices, Still Lives’ and ‘The Long Day Closes’ (1992) depict his childhood in a post-war, working-class Liverpool home. ‘Distant Voices, Still Lives’ provides a portrait of his parents and siblings around the time he was born. Through the film, audiences experience the stuff of life – the brutality of a patriarch (Pete Postlethwaite), a daughter’s wedding, sing-songs at the pub – but the flow of the film is more emotional than chronological, and Davies prefers resonant images and moments to straightforward storytelling. Its songs lift audiences, while its sadness bring them down. Mostly, though, it’s Davies’s love for cinema that is apparent in every single frame of this beautiful film.

Tickets for this very special double-bill are on sale now, with a limited number of seats still available at timeout.com/filmclub. The complete list of Time Out’s 100 Best British Films which can be found on the Time Out website, has been a runaway success, attracting over three quarters of a million views already.

timeout.com/film is the destination website for film lovers, featuring over 30,000 film reviews, the latest film releases and cinema times for your local cinema. Visit the site for lively debate, interviews with film directors and all the latest festival and award news.

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