Saving a Piece of the World for its Wildlife

NC Zoo Society employees rush to volunteer after extensive snow damage to Sylvan Heights Waterfowl Park and Breeding Center

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Hayley McWilliams helps repair damage at Sylvan Heights Waterfowl Park and Breeding Center

It was also important to repair netting and fencing as quickly as possible to keep the predators away.

(Vocus/PRWEB) January 12, 2011

Right after the holiday snow storm Hayley McWilliams got a call that there was extensive snow damage to Sylvan Heights Waterfowl Park and Breeding Center in Scotland Neck, North Carolina. Rare and endangered birds had been killed by the devastation and dozens were missing. She knew she must go help. She is just that kind of a person.

Although a trained volunteer in animal wildlife rescue, McWilliams is the Director of Retail for the NC Zoo Society. Proceeds from the two gift shops she oversees go directly to funding a wide variety of programs and projects that support animal well-being, conservation, education, field work, and research. Sylvan Heights Waterfowl Park and Breeding Center is one of the projects the Zoo Society supports.

McWilliams and another Society employee, Justin Richardson, were the first to respond to Sylvan Heights Waterfowl Park. They helped staff and local volunteers inspect the 26 acre facility looking for injured and trapped birds. “We were there to do whatever needed to be done,” said McWilliams. “It was also important to repair netting and fencing as quickly as possible to keep the predators away.” “We were afraid of loosing more birds.”

This wasn’t the first time McWilliams was quick to volunteer during a time of crisis. In 2003, the Pisgah Covered Bridge, one of Randolph County’s historical and cultural treasures, was destroyed by a flash flood. McWilliams was one of the first people to recover pieces of the bridged that had washed away.

McWilliams has worked for the NC Zoo Society, raising money and awareness for the Zoo and its initiatives, for 16 years. The NC Zoo Society, an independent association of members, is committed to fostering enduring personal connections between people and nature. They strongly support the North Carolina Zoo and its projects that educate and inspire people about their natural environment. The Society, through the Zoo, conserves wildlife and wild places throughout the world, promotes scientific research and advocacy, encourages relationships with nature through outdoor recreation, and generates respect for animals and their welfare.

Asked why she does it, McWilliams quickly responds, “Because I really believe it’s our responsibility to save a piece of the world for its wildlife.”

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