The Shrine Of The Most Blessed Sacrament Celebrates Its Centennial Birth.

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This year marks the 100th anniversary of The Shrine Of The Most Blessed Sacrament in Chevy Chase, Maryland. The Roman Catholic parish will celebrate one of the first of many Centennial events, on March 8, 2011 at 7:00 p.m. with a Solemn High Mass in Latin. The Mass will be celebrated according to the Extraordinary Form of the Roman Missal of 1962, as authorized by Blessed Pope John XXIII.

Shrine Of The Most Blessed Sacrament

In celebrating our Centennial Year we recognize parts of our life, over the past 100 years and certainly one of the most significant, is the mass as it was offered through most of the period, the Mass in Extraordinary Form.

This year marks the 100th anniversary of The Shrine Of The Most Blessed Sacrament in Chevy Chase, Maryland. The Roman Catholic parish will celebrate one of the first of many Centennial events, on March 8, 2011 at 7:00 p.m. with a Solemn High Mass in Latin. The Mass will be celebrated according to the Extraordinary Form of the Roman Missal of 1962, as authorized by Blessed Pope John XXIII.

David Gardiner, Chairman of the Liturgy Planning Committee for Blessed Sacrament, explains the importance of preparing for the Mass in the Extraordinary Form, “Monsignor Charles Pope, the liaison for celebrating the 1962 Missal in the Archdiocese of Washington, ensures that proper training and education take place before celebrating the Extraordinary Form in Archdiocesan churches. Great care will be taken so the rites are celebrated properly and with understanding of the elements that make up the liturgy. In other words, it is not something to enter into lightly and without preparation.”

Every Catholic Mass, whether in the Ordinary Form or the Extraordinary Form, is the church's celebration of Christ's Paschal mystery: His passion, death and resurrection. For Catholics, the Mass is the summit of the Christian life and belief. In the last 40 years, this particular form of Mass became a rarity, but is becoming more frequently celebrated in some parts of the world, including some metro-area parishes. Highlights of this Mass will include priest and people together facing east when praying. Ad Oriens is Latin for, “to the east” which is intended to represent facing Jerusalem and praying toward the resurrected Christ. Being that the Extraordinary Form is a Solemn High Mass, the entire celebration will be completely sung except for the sermon and the prayers of Consecration which are recited silently by the priest.

Gardiner says, “This mass is simply another way in which we can celebrate the Holy Eucharist. Many older people still feel attached to it, but new interest in the traditional liturgy is very high among young people. Many priests have told me that the traditional liturgy helps them, as well as laity, renew and deepen their understanding and appreciation of the Ordinary Form of the Mass. What is critical is the understanding that there is only one Mass -- just different ways of celebrating it."

“In celebrating our Centennial Year we recognize parts of our life, over the past 100 years and certainly one of the most significant, is the mass as it was offered through most of the period, the Mass in Extraordinary Form,” says Father Jim Boccabella of Blessed Sacrament.

For more information regarding Mass In The Extraordinary Form from The Missal Of 1962, please contact David Gardiner at dmgardiner(at)gardinerhall(dot)com.

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Janice Ockershausen
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