Cardiology PACS Adoption Maturing, while Integration with CVIS and/or PACS is a Work in Progress

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80% of U.S. hospitals with cath labs have implemented a formal Cardiology PACS (CPACS) system to store and utilize their cardiology-related images, such as cardiac cath, echocardiography, interventional angiography, electrophysiology, CT, MR, SPECT and PET/CT images.

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U.S. hospitals have made significant progress in integrating cardiology images with non-image data in cardiology PACS and CVIS systems over the past three years.

According to a newly released study by IMV Medical Information Division, 80% of the U.S. hospitals with cath labs have implemented a formal Cardiology PACS (CPACS) system to store and utilize their cardiology-related images, such as cardiac cath, echocardiography, interventional angiography, electrophysiology, CT, MR, SPECT and PET/CT images. This proportion has increased substantially from the 51% of hospitals having CPACS as reported in a similar study conducted by IMV in 2007.

IMV’s new report, The 2010 Cardiology Information Continuum: Present Access and Future Integration Strategies for Cardiovascular Image and Information Systems, describes hospitals’ present access to Cardiology PACS and CVIS. Cardiology PACS or “CPACS” is defined as integrated systems that at least have the ability to access cath lab and echo images, and might also have the ability to access diagnostic images from other modalities, whereas cardiovascular information systems or “CVIS” contain other patient-specific cardiovascular-related data, such as hemodynamic monitoring, EKG, and reporting capabilities for clinical results.

“U.S. hospitals have made significant progress in integrating cardiology images with non-image data in cardiology PACS and CVIS systems over the past three years,” observed Lorna Young, Senior Director of Market Research. “Cardiologists need patient images to be integrated with related non-image patient information in order to create structured reporting capabilities. More than three in five of the surveyed hospitals, 63%, indicated they have both CPACS and CVIS systems. An additional 17% have a CPACS, but no CVIS, 12% have a CVIS, but no CPACS, while only 8% of the hospitals have no formal implementation of a CPACS or CVIS. Of the sites that have both systems, nearly half indicated that their CPACS and CVIS systems are fully integrated, while the rest have not yet fully integrated these two systems. As a result, about one-third of all U.S. hospitals with cath labs presently have an integrated CPACS-CVIS system. Common components in an integrated CPACS and CVIS system include workstations, data archive infrastructures, and a common patient-centric database.”

IMV’s report also explores the present relationship between a hospital’s Cardiology PACS and Radiology PACS installations, and identifies hospitals’ plans for the development of their cardiology image and information systems over the next 3-5 years. Vendors covered in this report include Agfa, GE, Fuji, Lumedx, McKesson, Meditech, Merge, Philips, and Siemens. Other highlights include:

  •     Cardiac cath and echocardiography images and structured reporting form the backbone of the ideal integrated CPACS and CVIS system, with either or both modalities specified by all of the respondents. The third modality presently accessible or planned for access is interventional angiography.
  •     45% of the CPACS respondents that also have a radiology PACS have not yet integrated any common components with their existing radiology PACS.
  •     87% of the hospitals are planning to purchase new, upgrade, replace, or integrate their current CPACS and/or CVIS capabilities over the next three years, with only 13% planning no investment activity.
  •     Respondents were most likely to say that their cardiology departments (32.5%) or cardiac cath labs (18.5%) will manage their hospital’s cardiology systems capital budget in the future. The systems budget is next most likely to be managed by an IT/MIS department, either within the hospital (15.5%) or at a healthcare system level (14.0%).

IMV's 2010 Cardiology Information Continuum Report is based on the responses from 200 department administrators who are CPACS decision makers, including cardiovascular services administrators, IT/MIS directors, CPACS managers, and radiology administrators in U.S. hospitals that have at least one cardiac cath lab installed. For more information about IMV’s report, visit http://CVIISReport.imvinfo.com or call 847-297-1404 to speak with a representative.

ABOUT IMV
IMV is a market research consulting firm founded in 1977 specializing in medical imaging and other advanced healthcare technology markets. IMV's marketing consulting services, in combination with our census databases of U.S. imaging sites with selected modalities, provide clients valuable assistance in strategic planning, customer satisfaction, product development and sales initiatives.

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Gail Prochaska