New Book Teaches Girls Money is No Fairytale

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"It's obvious the history books have it all wrong," Hining says. "Whoever wrote the story of Cinderella somehow got the notion that the sooty lass just put on a pretty dress, caught the eye of a prince, and suddenly became a princess."

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"It's obvious the history books have it all wrong," Hining says. "Whoever wrote the story of Cinderella somehow got the notion that the sooty lass just put on a pretty dress, caught the eye of a prince, and suddenly became a princess."

Deborah Hining's new book, 'The True Story of Cinderella and How She Really Became a Princess,' offers a witty re-write of the well-loved fairytale. In the story, Hining clarifies several "historical inaccuracies" regarding the princess.

"It's obvious the history books have it all wrong," Hining says. "Whoever wrote the story of Cinderella somehow got the notion that the sooty lass just put on a pretty dress, caught the eye of a prince, and suddenly became a princess."

The book teaches that while fairy godmothers do exist, making our wishes come true requires hard work, determination, and careful financial planning. With the average American household carrying a credit card debt of $8,000 or more, Hining's message of careful planning and budgeting is more timely now than ever.

In 'The True Story of Cinderella,' our heroine embarks on an entrepreneurial adventure, starting with ashes and then growing them into a successful, bustling pumpkin patch. She learns to track her investments and returns, sets goals, and spends within her means. Only when she is independently successful and happy on her own does she fall in love with the prince and become the princess we've all come to know and admire.

"No one ever said Princessing was easy… But don't worry, we'll manage somehow. I'm not a Fairy Godmother for nothing, and I love a challenge!" (Excerpt from 'The True Story of Cinderella.')

'The True Story of Cinderella' is a modern, inspiring story for pre-teen and teenage girls, teaching them that there's more to life than waiting for a prince charming. They can be the princess they want to be, but they'll have to work for it.

The clever, modern illustrations, created by the author's husband, Michael Hining, daughter Mary Elizabeth, and artist Nathan Johnson, will appeal to both teenagers and young women alike. The bright colors and cartoonish characters are a far cry from the flowery pastels of traditional fairy tales, enhancing the book's position as a modern take on an age-old story.

Hining's writing is pithy, witty, and very entertaining. Combine that with an incredibly important message of financial solvency for tomorrow's woman, and you have a must-read for any young girl who wants more to life than being rescued by a prince charming (who might not be so charming after all).

'The True Story of Cinderella' is available for purchase from Light Messages, Amazon, Barnes and Noble, and other major book sellers.

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Deborah Hining
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