American Sentinel University’s New Q&A Profiles Why Magnet Recognition Program Matters to Nurses

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American Sentinel University debuts a new Q&A for nurses, ‘Why Magnet® Matters to Nurses,’ exclusively available to nursing professionals at American Sentinel’s booth #920 at the ANCC National Magnet Conference® October 4-6. The ‘Why Magnet® Matters to Nurses’ Q&A features two Magnet® appraisers who answer nursing students’ questions about the Magnet Recognition Program and what it means to today’s nurses. Learn more about American Sentinel University’s accredited online BSN, MSN and DNP programs online at http://www.americansentinel.edu/health-care.

American Sentinel University, offering CCNE-accredited bachelor’s and master’s nursing degree programs mapped to the Quality and Safety Education for Nurses (QSEN) guidelines, debuts a new Q&A for nurses, ‘Why Magnet® Matters to Nurses,’ exclusively available to nursing professionals at American Sentinel’s booth #920 at the ANCC National Magnet Conference® October 4-6.

Magnet recognition – a distinguished honor awarded by the American Nurses Credentialing Center to hospitals that pass the arduous process to exhibit nursing excellence – is a leading driver within the nursing profession today because it emphasizes professional development and higher education. It ensures that nursing will increase in relevance as a profession and that nurses can advance in the discussions and decision-making around patient care and outcomes.

American Sentinel’s ‘Why Magnet® Matters to Nurses’ Q&A features Magnet® appraisers Eddie Beard, senior vice president and CNO of Catawba Valley Medical Center, and Kim Sharkey, vice president medicine and CNO of Saint Joseph’s Hospital of Atlanta, who have answered nursing students’ questions about the Magnet Recognition Program and what it means to today’s nurses. Topics profiled include:

-Why Magnet status matters

-Questions nurses should ask when seeking employment at a Magnet hospital

-Shared governance models and how nurses can contribute

-Importance of BSN degrees

-Loss of Magnet designation and its impact on employees

-Benefits of attending the ANCC National Magnet Conference®

-Nursing-sensitive indicators

-Hospital Consumer Assessment of Health Care Providers and Systems (HCAHPS)

-Finding Magnet hospitals

-Nursing research programs

-Magnet recognition designation

American Sentinel University is committed to supporting nursing through educational development of working nurses,” says Dr. Catherine Garner, DrPH, MSN, RN, FAAN, dean, health sciences and nursing, at American Sentinel. “We believe that the beside nurse should be a champion for quality care and patient outcomes and have designed our RN to BSN program based on the Quality and Safety Education for Nursing (QSEN) guidelines, with emphasis on leading change, critical thinking, and use of evidence-based practice – all important criteria for the Magnet Recognition Program.”

Dr. Garner will attend the National Magnet Conference® and is available for one-on-one meetings with nurses, nurse managers, CNOs, and anyone seeking guidance about advancing their education or career. Find Dr. Garner at American Sentinel University’s booth #920.

Dr. Garner notes that it is important to create a culture where nurses are engaged. It is preferred and encouraged that nurses continue their education once their facility achieves Magnet status. For hospitals aspiring to seek Magnet® status, The Commission on Magnet® has set the expectation that effective Jan. 1, 2011, 75 percent of nurse managers have at least a baccalaureate degree in nursing. By Jan. 1, 2013, the requirement rises to 100 percent.

“Higher education helps nurses develop critical thinking and better communication skills as well as an openness to new ideas and new models of care – resulting in the highest possible standard of patient care,” says Dr. Garner.

American Sentinel’s CCNE-accredited bachelor’s nursing degree (BSN) provides real-world education mapped to the Quality and Safety Education for Nurses (QSEN) guidelines. Fostered by action learning with real-world applications, courses focus on evidence-based practice, quality outcomes, teamwork, communication, stewardship of resources and leadership. More information about American Sentinel’s online BSN program can be found here: http://www.americansentinel.edu/health-care/rn-to-b-s-nursing.

The RN to MSN and MSN degree programs, also mapped to QSEN and CCNE-accredited, allow nurses to specialize in management and leadership, nursing education, nursing informatics, case management, and infection prevention and control, all critical roles in the evolving health system. For more information about the online RN to MSN, visit http://www.americansentinel.edu/health-care/rn-to-m-s-nursing or for the online MSN degree, visit http://www.americansentinel.edu/health-care/m-s-nursing.

American Sentinel’s doctor of nursing practice executive leadership is practice-based, taking top nursing executives to a new level of understanding in the areas of health policy, finance, business intelligence using informatics, leadership, and strategic planning and health services research. Learn more at http://www.americansentinel.edu/health-care/dnp-executive-leadership.

“We are proud that many of our students are leaders in Magnet organizations, showing their commitment to improving nursing through education,” adds Garner.

Stop by American Sentinel’s booth #920 at the ANCC National Magnet Conference October 4-6 to learn more about American Sentinel University’s accredited online BSN, MSN and DNP programs or visit them online at http://www.americansentinel.edu/health-care or call 866.922.5690.

About American Sentinel University
American Sentinel University delivers the competitive advantages of accredited online degree programs in nursing, informatics, an MBA Health Care, and a DNP Executive Leadership. Its online bachelor’s and master’s nursing degree programs are accredited by the Commission for the Collegiate Nursing Education (CCNE). The university is accredited by the Distance Education and Training Council (DETC). The Accrediting Commission of DETC is listed by the U.S. Department of Education as a nationally recognized accrediting agency and is a recognized member of the Council for Higher Education Accreditation.

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Renee Hewitt
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