National Demolition Association Offers Keys to Successful Demolition Projects

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Architects, engineers, real estate developers, general contractors, and purchasing agents should have a basic understanding of the demolition process and what’s involved in a standard demolition contract before embarking on a demolition project. The National Demolition Association is offering a free planning guide and sample contract language to help buyers keep to project schedules and costs, and avoid unforeseen liabilities.

The better everyone understands the demolition process beforehand, the less likely there will be disputes and requests for change orders down the line.

Real estate developers, architects, and engineers should have a basic understanding of the demolition process and what should be included in a standard demolition contract before embarking on a demolition project, said the executive director of the National Demolition Association. In response to this need, the Association is offering a free checklist that will take the client through to the completion of a successful demolition job.

“The NDA developed the Demolition Planning Document to give the buyers of our services the recommendations to help minimize any problems that might occur during the process,” said Michael R. Taylor, CAE. “The better everyone understands the demolition process beforehand, the less likely there will be disputes and requests for change orders down the line.”

In addition to the Demolition Planning Document, the NDA is posting a Model Demolition Specification, which offers specific contract language buyers can consider including in their contracts to make sure they manage all parties’ expectations concerning things such as permitting, insurance, health and safety reports, and waste disposal.

Taylor explained that a successful project requires a great deal of pre-planning in order for both the demolition contractor and owner/operator of the site to coordinate all facets of the project. “Almost every project involves some detours and changes that inevitably occur,” he said. “But with a solid plan and direct course of action, the negative impact on project schedules, costs, and liabilities can be kept to an absolute minimum.”

Along with the Purdue Press textbook on the demolition process Demolition: Practices, Technology and Management (Richard Diven, Mark Shaurette), the National Demolition Association is leading the way by presenting in a systematic way for the first time the means and methods that define what modern demolition contractors do. “Frankly, many of our clients really haven’t understood the demolition process in the past,” Taylor said. “One of the main goals of the Association today is to expand the public knowledge base so that our customers, including those in the construction, engineering, architectural, and real estate markets, have the tools they need to do their jobs better.”

The Demolition Planning Document, now posted on the National Demolition Association website http://www.demolitionassociation.com, has a checklist of stages or activities that must be completed in every job, which may include:

  •      Proposed use of site
  •     Utility disconnect responsibility
  •     Reuse of materials from project
  •     Extent of underground demolition
  •     Responsibility of temporary facilities
  •     Expected site condition after demolition

In addition to the Demolition Planning Document posted on the website, the Model Demolition Specification includes sample submittals, general conditions, and pre-execution, execution, and restoration and closeout language for consideration, as well as a sample insurance requirement document posted for viewing.

“The National Demolition Association is intent on taking a giant step forward in helping our clients purchase our members’ services in a knowledgeable way, while eliminating many of the problems that often arise on a construction or demolition site,” Taylor said. “These documents are one way we’re making this happen.”

To view the Demolition Planning Document and the Model Demolition Specification, go http://www.demolitionassociation.com, and click on “Our Industry.” Printable and downloadable pdf’s are available.

The National Demolition Association is a non-profit trade organization representing approximately 1,000 U.S. and Canadian companies and many international firms that are involved in the demolition process. Membership includes demolition contractors, general contractors, civil engineering firms, and recycling, landfill, and salvage operations. The association’s efforts help members stay abreast of environmental, regulatory and safety matters, keep regulators informed about issues facing the industry, increase public and industry awareness, and provide members with networking opportunities and information on the latest technical advances in equipment and services. The website is http://www.demolitionassociation.com.

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