"Electric Fence" Automated Cell Migration Assay

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Applied BioPhysics, Inc., an analytical instrument manufacturer based in Troy, NY, announces a new impedance-based assay for automated cell migration. In the “electric fence” assay, high current pulses are applied to the small ECIS electrode immediately after cell inoculation to prevent cells from attaching and spreading, while a cell layer forms on the rest of the substrate. When the “electric fence” is turned off, cells surrounding the open electrode migrate in to fill the void. The progress of this migration is electrically monitored and a migration rate is calculated.

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When the 'electric fence' is turned off, cells surrounding the open electrode migrate in to fill the void. The progress of this migration is electrically monitored and a migration rate is calculated.

Applied BioPhysics, Inc. introduces a new and novel technique to measure the rate of cell migration in tissue culture. The technique is based on their successful ECIS (Electric Cell-substrate Impedance Sensing) technology - the very first impedance-based method to monitor cell behavior.
Previously, ECIS measured cell migration with an automated wound-healing assay. In this approach cells, first grown to confluence upon a small ECIS electrode, were killed using a high current pulse. The migration of healthy cells to repopulate the electrode was then monitored and the migration rate calculated.
In the “electric fence” assay, high current pulses are applied to the small ECIS electrode immediately after cell inoculation to prevent cells from attaching and spreading, while a cell layer forms on the rest of the substrate. When the “electric fence” is turned off, cells surrounding the open electrode migrate in to fill the void. The progress of this migration is electrically monitored and a migration rate is calculated.
Both the ECIS wounding and “electric fence” assays are easy to do and make an attractive replacement to the mechanical scrape-wound approach. In the ECIS assays, the protein layer adsorbed on the substrate is not removed by scraping, and with the “electric fence”, the cells migrate upon a surface not previously modified by cultured cells, thus permitting determination of how cell migration is affected by a virgin substrate.
Published applications using ECIS include measurements of cell migration, endothelial barrier function, extravasation of normal cell layers by metastatic cells, signal transduction, cell-ECM interactions, cytotoxicity, cytopathic effects of viral infections and cell proliferation.
Applied BioPhysics has over 25 years of experience with impedance-based cell assays put into one instrument line. ECIS instruments and consumable 8-well and 96-well arrays are used in biological research and drug discovery. ECIS offers the ability to measure both simple and complex impedance over a wide range of AC frequencies.

For further information contact:

Dr. Charles Keese
Applied BioPhysics
185 Jordan Road
Troy, NY 12180
Ph: 1-866-301-ECIS (3247)
Fax 518-880-6860
keese(at)biophysics(dot)com

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