MyReviewsNow Online Shopping Features New World War II Documentary

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"The World at War" documentary details the struggles and conflicts of the great war. MyReviewsNow Online Shopping is exited to offer "The World at War" in its Reference and Education store.

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MyReviewsNow Online Shopping and affiliate, Time Life, present “The World at War”, a groundbreaking documentary series that studies the events that led up to World War II's first battle. It documents the political climate in Germany within the 1930s, and the nine Blue-ray discs offers new insight into how Hitler was capable of soaring to such power in the short amount of time he did. Then the course of war is charted from the invasion of Poland to the ultimate surrender of Japan.

This is a far cry from the usual tedious historical documentary, as “The World at War” provides rarely seen footage, such as chronicling what life is like aboard a German U-boat, Winston Churchill visiting troops in stationed in Africa and Hitler relaxing during rare down time at his Bavarian castle. A new light is shed on the effects of the World War II on the civilian population, which has been largely ignored. Viewers get a rare look at London residents taking shelter from nightly German bombings and the devastating wreckage of Hamburg after an Allied raid that set off an enormous firestorm.

If you're looking to gain insight into how the conflict began and played out, “The World at War” is a historical documentary that you should not miss. These events defined the twentieth-century and is an exceptional selection for those who want a complete and utter analysis of the war.

Made in 1973, there is no exaggerating the utter power and force of this documentary. At the time of the conflict, no one thought of the war as recent history, just as no one in today's society feels that the conflict's consequences had ended by the 1970s. Decades later, it's obvious in the documentary's footage that by the time of filming in the '70s, the war's effects were still felt by the people.

The documentary exudes heartache, and the interviewee's memories are still raw and fresh. The soldiers who fought in the conflict were in their 50s, and most of the generals and politicians involved with the war were still alive. When they reminisce about the German home front or about war actions, Albert Speer is interviewed. German U-boat captains give their recollections about the massive effect of the German U-boats, and there is commentary from British and American supply ship captains, Adm. Karl Dönitz, who was thrust into the head of the Third Reich position after Hitler's suicide. Commentary also focuses on England's parliament members and the debates that led to Winston Churchill's prime minister appointment. Many parliament members saw Churchill as a "cowboy" and wanted Lord Halifax as prime minister, and the back-and-forth is documented in the series.

The narrative is easily understandable, and the images chosen are nothing short of haunting. This is by no means a comfortable viewing experience, but a well-defined, detailed, faithful and sincere document of the worst catastrophe that has ever altered the lives of tens of millions of people, whose lives were impacted in horrific and unimaginable ways. The documentary is narrated effectively by the actor of the generation, Laurence Olivier and Carl Davis' musical score is melancholic and haunting.

World War II was the most expensive war ever waged, and was both costly in monetary value and human casualties. It entangled more countries than any other war, and there in military actions on virtually every continent as a result. The war was also the first to be extensively captured on film.

No recreations were used, so viewers get to witness real footage and interviews with those who were present, Sir Jeremy Isaacs put together what is considered the penultimate historical documentary series on World War II. The series has garnered international critical acclaim and received several prestigious awards. Time Life has made the entire series, which is 34 hours long (included are 12 hours of bonus material), available for the first time to viewers.    

For further information regarding "The World at War" documentary, please visit MyReviewsNow Online Shopping.

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