Trustworthy Mobile Security for Smartphones, Tablets, etc. – Is There an App for That? New White Paper by Intimus Consulting Show Risks and Challenges of Mobile Security

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The past ten years have witnessed a remarkable shift in the way that businesses, organisations and individuals can access computing power. The very concept of a “computer” has irrevocably changed. In its new white paper intimus consulting deals with the new challenges that users of mobile devices all over the world will increasingly face in the near future.

The past ten years have witnessed a remarkable shift in the way that businesses, organisations and individuals can access computing power. The very concept of a “computer” has irrevocably changed. In its new white paper intimus consulting deals with the new challenges that users of mobile devices all over the world will increasingly face in the near future.

In the “old days” of 2001, a computer was something that sat on a desk, with a hard drive in a nearby tower. Laptop computers were widely considered to be too expensive or unreliable for everyday use, and were often assigned only to regular business travellers or to the more valuable members of the organisation.

In 2001, smartphones existed, but they were mainly used by technology enthusiasts and early adopters, and were not nearly as widespread as they are today. (White Paper by intimus consulting, a brand of the Martin Yale Group).

Most people carried “cell phones,” which were big and bulky by today’s standards, and were mainly used only to make phone calls. Simply being able to send a text message was considered the height of cell phone communications technology.

What a difference ten years can make. Today, smartphone users can access their e-mail, take and share high quality digital photos and videos, listen to music, watch movies, and connect to the Internet from anywhere, allowing them to interact with their world and be productive in unprecedented ways. Even as desktop PCs and laptops/notebooks have grown in speed and power, they have also started to be eclipsed by ever smaller, ever lighter models like netbooks (popular during 2008-2009) and more recently by tablet PCs like the iPad.

According to research from Gartner, sales of tablet computers are expected to more than quadruple from 15 million units sold worldwide in 2010, to over 70 million sold during 2011. Total tablet computer shipments are expected to approach 250 million by 2015.

Tablet computers enable the same kinds of constant connectivity and interactions as a smartphone, but their larger screens and easier operability make it possible to bring computing power into workplaces in new ways. With a tablet computer, the factory floor can now be easily connected to the company’s main network. Knowledge workers can access information via tablet computers in a lighter, more portable format. Hospital workers can record patient information at the bedside using a simple touch screen Restaurant staff can take reservations and coordinate seating with a tablet. The possibilities are limitless.

One of the biggest reasons for the differences between the fixed “computers” of 2001 and the smartphones and tablet computers of today is the rise of solid-state storage media.

Rather than relying on the moving parts of a hard disk drive, smartphones and tablets are built with sold-state drives, which enable these devices to be more portable and powerful than ever before.

“Computers” are no longer fixed objects sitting on a desk. People now have the ability to carry “computers” in their pockets in the form of smartphones (which recently surpassed PCs in total worldwide shipments).

The dramatic increases in portability and flexibility of computer power has made possible great gains in productivity and a significant transformation in online culture as the Internet begins to infuse every aspect of daily life.

But along with the benefits of the rise of smartphones and tablet computers, there are risks. The same features that make smartphones and tablets so beneficial can also pose damaging threats to the sensitive data of organisations.

This paper will discuss some of the information security risks posed by the emerging solid-state media, such as smartphones and tablet computers. By exercising best practices and information assurance strategies, organisations can successfully navigate the risks posed by these powerful new forms of electronic storage media.

To read the full white paper please visit: http://www.intimus.com/index.php?intimus_white_papers_en

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Dagmar Strunz
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