The Institute for Vibrant Living®: Study on How Green Tea May Help Lower Cholesterol

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The Institute for Vibrant Living® examines how a study out of Japan may support the use of green tea and green tea extract as a means for lowering LDL and total cholesterol and raises HDL cholesterol in animals and people.

Green Tea Elixir™

The Institute for Vibrant Living® examines how a study out of Japan may support the use of green tea and green tea extract as a means for lowering LDL and total cholesterol and raises HDL cholesterol in animals and people.

Cholesterol is a waxy steroid manufactured in the liver and intestines. It is used by the body for insulation of nerve fibers and for the creation of cell membranes and hormones. However, health issues can arise when there is an excess of total and LDL (bad) cholesterol and not enough HDL (good) cholesterol.

Clogged arteries, which can contribute to heart disease and stroke, are a result of excessive total and LDL cholesterol. HDL cholesterol helps to transport bad cholesterol out of the bloodstream. Green tea is a natural substance that seems to have a remedial effect on HDL, LDL and total cholesterol – moving all in a healthier direction.

A large study out of Japan examined 13,916 employees (8476 men and 5440 women) at over 1000 workplaces in the Nagano Prefecture. These individuals ranged between 40 and 69 years of age. Subjects were screened for general health and were asked to complete a questionnaire evaluating their diet, daily exercise, lifestyle habits and green tea consumption. The subjects did not have morbid health conditions that affected serum cholesterol levels.

When cholesterol levels were compared with green tea consumption, a link was established between lower total cholesterol levels in men and women and higher green tea consumption. Ten cups per day appeared to offer the most benefit, but higher consumption did not have further effect.

Researchers determined that the “consumption of green tea was associated with lower serum concentration of cholesterol in Japanese healthy workers age 40-69 years…”

Another important double-blind, randomized study of six urban hospitals in China examined 240 men and women patients with mild or moderately-high cholesterol. The subjects were already following a low-fat diet and were randomly assigned capsules supplemented with 375 mg of theaflavin green tea extract or a placebo for a period of 12 weeks.

After the study period, total cholesterol in the group receiving the theaflavin extract dropped by 11.3%, LDL cholesterol was lowered by 16.4%, and HDL cholesterol increased by 2.3%. There were no significant changes within the placebo group.

The researchers concluded that “the theaflavin-enriched green tea extract we studied is an effective adjunct to a low saturated fat diet..." for reduction of LDL cholesterol in adults with mild to moderately-high cholesterol levels.

These studies and others have shown that green tea lowers LDL and total cholesterol and raises HDL cholesterol in animals and people. People with mild to moderately high cholesterol may benefit from this natural remedy. As green tea does contain caffeine, it might be beneficial to look into a supplemental green tea extract in place of ten cups of tea.

About the Institute for Vibrant Living®
A leader in the dietary supplement industry, the Institute for Vibrant Living is committed to providing customers with evidence based nutritional supplements. Their unique product line reflects a belief that anyone can achieve lifelong health. All products and formulations are based on extensive research, clinical trials and case studies. All products are 100% guaranteed.

To learn more about the Institute for Vibrant Living® please visit their website at http://www.IVLProducts.com.

This information is meant to be used to educate the reader and is not intended to provide individual medical advice. Before you take any supplement, please consult your physician or other licensed healthcare professional to determine if it's appropriate for you. This information is brought to you by the Institute for Vibrant Living®.

Sources:
Tokunaga S, White IR, Frost C, et al. Green tea consumption and serum lipids and lipoproteins in a population of healthy workers in Japan. Annals of Epidemiology 2002;12(3):157-65.

Maron DJ, Lu GP, Cai NS, et al. Cholesterol-lowering effect of a theaflavin-enriched green tea extract: a randomized controlled trial. Arch Intern Med 2003;163(12):1448-53.

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Nicole Forrester
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